Best Music Apps

KASPAR – Review

KASPAR is developed by Yonac

Available from iTunes App Store

KASPAR (resisting obvious children’s cartoon references) launches with a fierce dragon logo before quickly revealing the synthesizer and all its glory. It is an immediate impression that perhaps intentionally conveys to the user that they just released a majestic, mythical beast. This is however no myth.

In order to properly control such power a proper cage is needed to house it. What I’m saying is don’t expect to fully enjoy KASPAR on anything older than an iPad Air. The developer has included this warning in the App Store description. Somehow a couple ding dongs still wrote bad reviews because this powerful new synthesizer doesn’t work well on their old iPad 4s. Who’s fault is that? Come on. There is a very fair warning upfront that they ignored. Makes as much sense as complaining to the makers of a gold fish bowl that their product sucks because they can’t fit their pet shark in it. I’ll detail the recommendations a little more at the end of this review.


KASPAR is a massive synthesizer or really 8 synths in one with 4 touch controlled morphing (or Auto) groups. Each synth has 3 oscillators (totaling up to 24) with multiple waveforms. Dedicated filter envelopes, an arpeggiator, chord maker, 6 dedicated mods slots with 20 possible targets, 2 LFOs and more. With a strong morphing capability, loads of high quality sound effects, there doesn’t seem to be any limits to what you can come up with.

The 4 group morphing unit is controlled by touch and KASPAR can record your own custom morphing shapes that you draw. Each of the groups are x and y controls. The morpher allows for deep sound modulation control with an endless pallet of possibilities, shapes and sizes. Reassign synths easily to any group, control the x and y curve speeds and enjoy manually shaping your sound or set to “Auto” and watch it go on and morph whatever mode(6) and loop(4) type you choose.


In KASPAR it’s all bout layering. So of course there is a screen to make general adjustments to each of the 8 synths, volume, pan, and both FX bus levels. Similar to a standard mixer.


Choose from about 300 presets. Better yet, make your own synth patches from a variety of common and several unique waveforms for each of the 3 oscillators. All have pulse width/ timbre controls, and oscillators 2 & 3 also have ring modulation. The overall combined sound can have noise added with a wide tone control, and a glide option. Play polyphonic or mono with legato on or off. Pretty standard stuff. It’s the variety of unique waveforms that can spice things up. There are some interesting shapes to choose from and they can make serious impact on the sound that synth makes.


As you edit each layer of synths you will find a nice selection of independent filters to enable. All have their own unique qualities. The Fat 70’s, Formant and Comb are very cool. Mix and match your favorites or whatever your final patch design needs. They are all excellent. I couldn’t find anything lacking with the filters. I just wish I could copy a filter setting to use in a different synth layer. Come to think of it, that would be nice to have for the oscillators or other parameters as well.


Each synth has its own set of 2 LFOs and an envelope. Each LFO has 7 possible waveforms. On the Mod page (not shown) you can have up to 6 different modifiers for each synth with 20 possible sources. For a single synth having just 6 mods, might seem like it’s not much, but remember we can make up to 8 layers of 6 each. That means there are up to 48 possible mods throughout the layers. It adds up and doesn’t pose any significant limitation.


The 2 FX busses can both have up to 8 effects units selected. The signal flow is easily adjusted by touch, drag and drop. For those not familiar how busses work, it means you are sending a chain of FX to the overall sound, not inserted to each specific synth. However each synth has bus controls to adjust how much of each busses chain of FX are applied to them. It would be interesting to see what it would be like to have independent FX chains, varying units and parameters for each synth someday. I don’t think even the latest iPad Pro could handle that today? That said 2 busses are nothing to shrug off. The FX units are all high end and custom made for KASPAR. There’s plenty of interesting options and combinations.


Being a stand alone synthesizer, KASPAR wouldn’t be complete without its own recorder. It can also be used to play a imported loop along with whatever sound the app is making.

With such an enormous range KASPAR doesn’t just stop here. Each synth also has its own multi mode arpeggiator and chord maker. Program your own chords to a single key in a snap. That’s become more useful than I had thought it would.

Put it all together and you have one colossal or “super synth”. Even my iPad Air 2 performed well with heavy loads of layers, FX, arps, filters and morphs running with the “Best” audio generation quality at 256 buffer through Inter-App Audio in Cubasis. Yonac really did a good job with efficiency here. They also thoughtfully made sure to include full MIDI services, Audiobus, Abelton Link, and AU plug in.

KASPAR sports up to 12 polyphony (tested with 8), a pleasant interface with after touch and velocity controls. A very playable synth that unlocks layered sounds not seen on iOS until now. It is making summer of 2017 one of the best for synth lovers.

As I mentioned near the beginning of this review here are more device recommendations for this super synth. You should have an iPad Air, iPad Pro, iPad Mini 2 or newer. If you must try KASPAR on an older device like an iPad 4 and are willing to take the risk and not blame the developer, you might have decent results if you turn the buffer to 512 and the audio generation quality to its lowest or “Good” setting. Just know that you probably won’t always be able to use all 8 synths, mods, FX, arps etc.

*Tested with iPad Air 2

Best Music Apps Of 2013

Each year innovation is pushed to new heights for new iOS music apps. Some years and some apps more than others.
2013 has been a strange year to me, in many ways personally, but also in regards to what I’ve seen in music app development.
Not bad or anything, but it felt incomplete to me. Maybe?
It seemed like this year had been a little weak. Maybe not?
Could be simply that some things just didn’t get finished in time? Well, I am familiar with that having delayed my own work a few times to the point where my album “Chapters” can’t be released until a few weeks into 2014. I get it, stuff happens.

The thing I think was most glaringly missing in the iOS music app world was not one new, innovative iDAW. I sincerely expected to see something new this past year. Nope. Well, yes there were a couple new iDAWs released but sadly none were even close to being half as good as what already exists. Nothing that was breaking any new ground, or offering any new options. Total lack of innovation in this category for 2013.

There is no shortage of excellent iDAWs to choose from, just nothing new worth celebrating.

We did see some huge changes in how we can make music. Inter-App Audio arrived with iOS 7 (and a few bugs) and took the way we record and connect our music apps to a new level. Much remains to be seen, but it’s definitely headed in the right direction. At least we can now record at industry standards with IAA supporting 32 bit floating point, depth. This won’t matter much to a lot of people, and for many reasons. It does matter to me, but the reasons for that go way off topic. Let’s just leave it at that. Cool?

So it hasn’t been a silent year, or a disappointing year. Just a bit odd.
Nevertheless, several innovative, excellent, and exciting new music apps did arrive in 2013.
That all said, the following is my take on the best new music apps released in 2013.

iDAW
I think I covered this topic, there were none to speak of.

Best Drums

“STIX Electronic Drum Synthesizer” by, Alexander Smith.
This category is always thin compared to the rest. For me this was the most interesting and innovative.

Best Sequencer

>”Electrify NXT by Ingolf Koch

This fell into my hands a bit late. The original Electrify was an app I bought a long time ago (relatively speaking) but never bonded to. Electrify NXT is a whole new thing. Despite some reports of continued stability issues, I still choose Electrify NXT as best in the category. This app has a lot of good things going for it. Sequencing, sampling, looping, and a built in FM synthesizer. Loaded with effects, factory loops, and everything you need to mangle it all up. Electrify NXT is loaded with features and functionality. Compared to the other candidates in the “Sequencing” category, Electrify NXT is most useable as is. Not to mention it’s far more intuitive and easily understood.

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Best Audio Tools

Audio Mastering App by, iMusic Album

Auria may have the best mastering plugins and automation to make the job very detailed, but you’d have to spend an arm and leg to get them. This app has an excellent set of tools to master your final mix, including multi frequency stereo imaging. This is a budget mastering option, but it doesn’t sound like it. I find myself using it most of the time. It just needs automation.

Best Sound Effects

“Swoopster” by Holderness Media

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Here we have a fun and trippy flanger/fuzz effects stand alone app. Independent channels, or linked, fuzzy, or flanged, or throw it all on the mix, Swoopster delivers.

Best Synthesizer
It’s a tie! “Nave” by Waldorf Music and “CubeSynth” by VirSyn

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It’s been a great year for iOS Synthesizers. Choosing a single “best” synth was giving me indigestion. So I choose the two I find myself going to constantly and could not live without.
“Nave”
A super strong entry in the growing wave table synthesis category, developed by Waldorf and Tempo Rubato. Create, and tweak your own wave tables from recordings and even a nifty text to talk feature. Hefty routing options and extremely versatile make Nave one massive synth.

AND

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“CubeSynth”
VirSyn took additive synthesis and sound morphing to a new level. Extremely detailed parameter controls, tons of powerful sound designing tools, and oodles of interesting and endless combinations make the Cube one of the greatest iOS synths ever. Very underrated I think because so much of its power is not made obvious, but it’s all in there.

Most Needed App

“AudioReverb” by VirSyn
Why is a reverb app most needed? Well, it is my opinion that reverb has been a weakness in iOS music for too long. Sure Auria has a few excellent choices, even a fantastic Convolution Reverb, but what about non Auria users? Nothing? 2013 was the first year we had a few excellent reverb stand alone apps show up. VirSyn delivered the most impressive sounding of the bunch. It uses a remarkable algorithmic reverb with the high quality impulse response (real reverberations) recordings to combine for a very natural sounding effect. It doesn’t sound like an effect laying on top of something artificially. It sounds like a natural part of the music. That is something iOS music has been missing for a long time. No more suffering with “FreeVerb” or other cheap algorithmic knock offs. A quality option is here.

Instrument Emulation

“Galileo” by Yonac Inc
I may not be the biggest fan of organs, or even really have a complete understanding of them but I know when something just sounds great. Yonac Inc crafted this organ for iOS to have a sound that is emulated perfectly. They took an old time instrument and added modern extras, FX, and tools to make this the most impressive organ emulation I’ve ever heard. Some friends of mine who are organ aficionados schooled me on the topic, and insisted I not leave this one out. I wouldn’t have, but thanks anyway guys.

iOS Music App Of 2013

AudioMastering App, by iMusic Album

WHAT? Really? Yes! You can have some of the most amazing synths, drum machines or whatever’s, but if you intend to complete, polish, and make your production sound it’s best, you must have a way to master it all. Speaking as an iOS music production purest, it is my opinion and perspective that without a quality set of tools to master all that music from all those amazing apps, you’re just playing around. Not counting those who master on their computers. That doesn’t count.
The Audio Mastering App has a 10 band EQ, Harmonic Saturator, 3 band Stereo Imaging, and a Loudness Maximizer with adjustable ceiling. Up to 24 bit processing, dithering, multiple file conversion options and more. This is an affordable, and quality tool.
It just needs automation so adjustments can be made in real time.

Honorable Mention

WOW Filterbox by SurgarBytes

AUFX:Dub by Kymatica

Thor Polysonic Synthesizer by Propellerhead Software

iSEM by Arturia

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That wraps it up. I’m sure not everyone will agree with my “Best Of 2013” choices, and that’s OK. I considered many factors that are most important to me and that I think relate best to the iOS music production purest.

As always, I am looking forward to the things to come in 2014! My biggest hope is to see a big time iDAW that does a good job of delivering the most complete, under (but not limited to) one roof production environment.

LATE ADDITION

Best Potential

“Stroke Machine” by Wolfram Franke

This colorful new sequencer arrived in the nick of time. There weren’t a lot of new or innovative sequencers in 2013. It’s a surprisingly capable new sequencer. It looks like a toy, but it’s not. This is a very effective sequencer with bright future. There were some early hiccups, bugs and whatnot. Mr. Franke did a great job cleaning things up and released an update with loads of fixes and improvements. That’s encouraging. However, not enough yet as it is still lacking certain things, and suffering from some anti-intuitive procedures. Additionally as I dig in further this app is frustrating me to no end. Notably there are problems with sound selection, samples, and pattern or kit changing.
Look out for my review where I’ll go into detail on the good, bad, and frustrating in the Janurary issue of “Apptronica”.

NOTE: I had spent a lot of time with Stroke Machine prior to writing this and chose it for the “Best Sequencer”, but I was wrong on some crucial points I overlooked. Now that I’m really digging into this app as I write my review for Apptronica, I’m finding that there were big problems with this app , I had completely missed. Completely!
A reader brought to my attention some serious flaws. Initially I dismissed his complaints and thought everything was fine. Nope. I was wrong. So Mark, wherever you are, sorry about that. I also thank you for not just letting it go.

Stroke Machine is still something special and potentially huge. It just isn’t there today, or yesterday as I had originally thought. So I must do the right things. 1- Apologize to everyone for my error. 2- Give credit to Mark (see comments) for hitting me upside the head and waking me up. 3- Correctly apply a functionally superior app in the category of Best Sequencer where it truly belongs. As imperfect as it is. 4-Did I mention I’m sorry about my mistake?

The Must Have iOS Music Apps In My Process

Updated July 24 2013

A few additions and deletions to consider in this updated list. I’ve added some really impressive new apps, as well as removing a couple I’m tired of waiting for updates.
A couple of the most notable additions is Waldorfs Nave, Nave is special, and very powerful with tremendous sonic crafting options. “Audio Mastering” app which I find to be an extremely useful, and quality mastering option. If you are using something like Cubasis then it is absolutely essential.
Thor Polysonic Synthesizer, AUFX:Space ( a fantastic stand alone reverb ), and now that Audiobus is supported MorphWiz and SampleWiz are added.

A while ago I made a similar list of iOS music apps that I generally considered “Must Have” iOS Music Apps. It got a bit long & messy. It was more of a wide look at the apps I thought had a fairly universal appeal for anyone interested in making music this way. I’m making this new list to reflect a more current collection of iOS music apps, but most specific to what is used in my own process rather than a list of options or just simply great apps. There are so many great apps.
This is a response of sorts to the questions I am asked most often about my music process.”Hey, David! What music apps do you use and recommend?” And “Why?”

First. I only require that these have Audiobus support now, or at least AudioCopy/Paste until they can be updated with Audiobus. Any music app failing to have, or a plan to soon have those basic functions, are simply not installed. At least not until they do. I am always open to revisiting other excellent music apps when they are completed with these basic supports. The reason this is so important to me is because I have always been committed to the wire-free creative experience that iOS offers.
I enjoy that freedom most and it adds to my inspiration. Wires don’t appeal to me and I feel are no longer necessary in this day and age. If I wanted wires I’d use a laptop.
iTunes File Share is dreadful and not part of my process. The rare times ill use File Share is just to move projects for storage on my computer. Lastly, I only occasionally use Virtual MIDI and own no other hardware.

What I used previously versus what I use today is very different. So much has changed. The amazing growth and development in iOS music apps available today has advanced very quickly. It is a very exciting time for me as I’m sure it is for countless others who are equally (if not more) enthusiastic about this unique platform for music production.

So for what ever its worth, here is my list of apps I consider “Must Haves” and use in my process to make music. The ones I just can’t live without.

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iDAW

Auria – The single most complete iDAW for mixing, editing & mastering from cradle to grave.

Meteor- The next best thing to Auria for professional quality. Now with up to 24 tracks via IAP. Good automation and fantastic MIDI controls. Instruments, and solid FX, but paying extra for an EQ is offensive. Still great iDAW.

Synthesizers

PPG WaveGenerator, PPG WaveMapper, Animoog, Addictive Synth, Sunrizer Synth, Magellan Synth, NLogPro, Nave, Thor, CrystalSynth XT

Sequencers

iPolySix, SynergyStudio, Cubasis

Samplers

Samplr, CsGrain, SampleWiz

Granular/Synth

GrainScience, iPulsaret, iDensity, GrainBender, Stria.

Drum and Percussion

DM1-The Drum Machine, DrumJam, Stochastic, MoDrum. GlitchBreaks

Instruments

ThumbJam, Guitarism, OMGuitar, Gelileo Organ, MorphWiz

Virtual MIDI

Gestrument, MusixPro, ArpeggionomePro, Chordion.

FX

EchoPad, Filtatron, Turnado, AUFX:Space

Miscellaneous

Impaktor, AirVox

Tie It All Together, Edit, Master Etc.

Audiobus, AudioShare, Twisted Wave, Audio Mastering.

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There you have it. A list of the iOS music apps I must have in my process. This is by no means a declaration of any kind. Everyone has a unique process with apps they prefer. I hope that answers the question some of you have asked. I’m sure this will all change tomorrow. 🙂

Auria App Review – Version 1.10

 A Truly Capable iDAW

Auria Is Made By WaveMachine Labs

Review is based on experience with Auria on iPad 3 and 4. My first experiences with Auria were on iPad 2 which I no longer have and or recommend for this app. It’ll work on iPad 2, but with great difficulties if Audiobus is in the process.
My reviewed copy of Auria was purchased at full price. I now also currently beta test Auria, but cannot write about any beta related experience.
Therefore nothing in the following review has anything to do with any beta builds of this app and all to do with my own experiences with the production version available for sale.

UPDATED 11-25-2013
Auria now supports iOS7 Inter-App Audio. It’s working beautifully so far for me. This should be the preferred method over Audiobus whenever possible since IAA operates at 32 bits floating point. Twice the depth of the 16 that Audiobus and AudioCopy/Paste operates.
It doesn’t really matter much if you’re making electronic music, but for acoustic, and vocals, recording at 32 bits is preferable to most people. All around though it’s just better than 16 in some ways many people may not even notice. Such as with clipping. There’s less chance of clipping when recording at 32, and you can be a little less meticulous with levels.
I’ve been recording 16 bits for ages and got used to it, having no significant issues. However 32 is a nice option for recording. The only down side is that projects are much larger. It seems a bit more stable with IAA as well.

UPDATED Review 9-5-2013

It’s been a little while since I’ve updated my review of Auria. It’s hard to keep up with so many apps both new and updated. A lot has changed with Auria over the months. It’s improved stability, the UI is becoming more touch oriented, and now MIDI is getting under way. It’s not fully MIDI capable today, and mostly the MIDI functions center on using Auria with external tools, but this is a good start.
They’ve added MIDI Sync with MMC, & MTC including complete MTC chase and MIDI clock options. MIDI plug ins support, and MIDI remote control for controlling Auria with Mackie MCU and HUI surfaces round out this first MIDI update.
OK, I don’t really use that stuff, and I mostly care about using Auria with “virtual core MIDI” on my iPads along with other VCM capable apps. Not yet, but not too far off in the future either. That’ll be a grand day.
Among the new MIDI capabilities Auria V1.10 has some new looks and features. Mixdown to email, snap to locators, markers, and highlight. A nice little time saver. AudioShare is now fully (finally) integrated!
There is now a handy new “Icon Bar” on the top of the editing screen. Much better than sifting through drop downs for simple tasks (like Duplicate!) that should be right there, and now it is.

There is still some lag when dragging through the timeline or moving regions. That’s driving me crazy, but tolerable since it has no relation to the sound. It’s all about the sound, but I would appreciate that being improved.

When using Auria with Audiobus this version has improved its auto track input function making the menu surfing a little less annoying. Speaking of Audiobus with Auria, I’m happy to report that stability is improved. That’s a big deal, I think because before there were many occasions where I’d finish recording a track, then touch the (from the input app) Audiobus remote to switch back to Auria, and whammo, crash, recording gone! This had been my largest concern. I never lost a whole project like I have in Cubasis, but it was a big problem that’s now fixed.

I offer the following advice based on my own experiences with Auria to have the best time using it.

Aurias stability overall can largely be controlled by you the user. First, forget about using all this on anything less than iPads 3 or preferably 4 if you want the best possible experience. When using Audiobus with Auria, be sure to disable all FX and plug ins during those sessions. If you already have some then turn them off until after the Audiobus session. Use the track freeze!
Keep the number of Audiobus inputs to a minimum. I recommend using only one input at a time through Audiobus with no more than one FX unit as often as is possible.
Always shut down background apps not currently in use. The more apps running and or assigned simultaneously in Audiobus to Auria, the more there is potential for issues. It is also a good idea to set the disk buffer to “large”. That has nothing to do with latency, and will make Audiobus recording sessions much more reliable especially with longer recordings. Do these things and you will have very few issues if any. It works for me and I’ve tested this extensively with excellent and consistent results. The largest project I have had after finishing Audiobus recording sessions, was 21 (on average my typical project is around 12-14 tracks) tracks. Then I added, Pro Q, and Timeless in the aux slots. Each track had individual standard EQing, and half of those with 1 or more plug ins, but the tracks were all frozen while working on another. Some automation was also used. No CPU or memory warnings, but it was very close to the limits on my iPad 4. If I ran more than 2 unfrozen tracks with all that, then I got low CPU. Its not magic. Though I can’t imagine how anyone could do the same with a full 48 tracks?

Auria isn’t perfect but it does work just fine, if you understand how to operate it. Plenty of people say they can’t do “anything” but somehow I have almost no troubles at all? The reason I must conclude for them, is that they do not completely understand how to use this amazing application to its fullest. Comments from users that are focussed on the problems they are having are just unfair, and results of operator error. It has to be. If I am using it without any of the major problems others claim to experience constantly with everything they try, then either I have some super natural power or they are not understanding the app. I certainly have no special powers or abilities, so my conclusion must be correct. This isn’t rocket science. Anyone can learn to use Auria. Impatience or operator error does not a bad app make.

Auria still sports the greatest selection of high quality plug ins by a wide margin. The audio capabilities are far and away the best you can get on iOS. There are still minor bugs, mostly in the UI, but since they do not effect the sound, they are (albeit annoying) tolerable. If you want the best options for the best sound, then those bugs shouldn’t matter. Like many of you I am looking forward to MIDI being fully integrated successfully. Thankfully that ball is rolling.

ORIGINAL REVIEW BELOW:

 
When I first heard of Auria I thought, “There’s no way they can do this, is there?” 
WaveMachine Labs answers with a resounding YES, offering Auria, a professional quality digital audio workstation with a great many high quality bells and whistles.
With the capability to support up to 96kHz sample rate at 24 bits, 32 or 64 bit dual precision audio processing engine, 48 stereo or mono tracks, (44.1 & 48kHz up to 24 tracks on iPad 1) your digital productions are in good hands. Designed with the future in mind Auria has support for 3rd party VST plug ins at additional charge via IAP from big names like PSP Audioware, Overloud and more.


Auria has so many features and functions, I find I’m still having those “ah ha” moments as I work with this incredible iDAW. A quick run down of the more impressive features follows. AAF import/export, audio copy paste (ACP will always result in a max bit rate of 16) drop box, (they say MIDI is under development) 8 assignable subgroups, each with two aux sends, full automation, WIST support, Auria Link to run two devices with Auria for a sync of up to 96 tracks, automatic sample rate conversion, track freeze, a comprehensive waveform editor, and so many more.

The on board included effects are very well done. A classic Reverb, Stereo Delay, Stereo Chorus, Re Tune, EQ with expander, compressor, and limiter are a must for anyone wanting to master their final mix. Last but not least my very favorite effect of all is an outstanding Convolution Reverb with a full IR library of high quality reverberation types. This is the best reverb I have experienced with iOS apps. I’ve said it many times, reverb quality is one of the more glaring disabilities of this platform. For good reason, quality reverb is a big CPU hog. You can hear the tin, thin, dull lack of quality in all the iOS reverbs, some more than others, and some are really made quite well all things considered. None however currently compare to the depth, warmth, and expansive nature of Auria’s included Convolution Reverb Plug In.
Still not quite up to desktop standards, but it’s a huge improvement. It’ll do nicely.
Thanks to track freeze, using multiple FX on multiple tracks is an option. If you don’t freeze, Auria will overburden your device CPU. No problem, it’s not permanent, unfreeze, and freeze again all you want.
 
For more about the detailed specs visit WaveMachine Labs HERE
 
The user interface is designed well for multi touch. The usual pinch, spread zoom in/out, and swipe functions are present. I have experienced some response problems here and there, but they are going to fix things in time. For now a minor annoyance.

The layout is very simple looking, but packed with tools and functions to intuitively enjoy Instead of a single fade or cross fade setting, Auria has four that each affect the fade differently. These are great for all sorts of fade type effects, and cross fading two waveforms that merge into one seamlessly, with careful placement of course. Very cool, if you ask me.

 
Initially after inquiring about beta testing I was informed by A WaveMachine Labs representative that they did not currently have an active, dedicated end user beta test team. I took concerned note of that and had reported this in my earlier version of this review. Turns out that another representative has confirmed otherwise, and that they do in fact have a strong team of beta testers currently for Auria after all. I was misinformed, or missunderstood, at any rate I am very glad to hear they do indeed currently have this in place.

At the moment its got a few minor issues regarding compatibility with other apps. The problem is that certain apps no longer work with Auria on the same device simultaneously. This began after the most recent update (from August 8th negatively affecting some popular music apps, its temporary). It happens. No one is perfect, and Auria is extremely complex. I was told the next update will probably revert Auria to the previous audio compatibility settings that will in short, be less restrictive and allow those apps to be used again on the same device. Nothing to get discouraged over. WaveMachine Labs is very attentive and eager to improve. They are very responsive and have helped me out of a few pickles already. They ( and the very active forum ) have been very helpful with the Low Memory messages I was getting early on, and since then I’ve not had that message again. The support from WaveMachine Labs is encouraging. Remember Apple is often slow to approve submitted updates.

 
 Auria to me is as close to what I call the holy grail of iDAWs, as seen to date. It’s not all powerful, and won’t replace desktop DAWs, but with further development, refinement, and increased VST plug in support it could be someday.

It is the best iDAW available with no peer. It actually saddens me a bit to say that as I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my studio type apps for a good while. I’m not saying don’t ever buy any others, but it’s very hard to deny Auria’s presence as a game changer for mobile music production.
Its $49.99 price tag is high by the standards of most spoiled iOS customers, but relatively speaking it’s a very good value, and so are the additional plug ins. You get what you pay for.
I haven’t bought any of the current plug ins myself, as I’m finding the included tools are more than sufficient for my needs and desires for high quality results. I am excited about whats to come.

 

Transitioning from other studio apps to Auria might seem overwhelming at first glance.  I really haven’t experienced any instances where Auria presented me with anything confusing. Just some things that are new to me on this platform. Still, I read the user guide front to back and I’d recommend you do too. If you don’t want to, (really who wants to read a manual ?) but do have experience with apps like this, it will probably feel pleasantly familiar. Reading the guide will at least accelerate any potential learning curve while also uncovering useful things that might have otherwise been overlooked. For example I was very excited about 64 bit processing, but wasn’t clear on its impact compared to 32. I discovered you can either select 64 bit processing, or unselect it to default at 32 bits. 32 bits lessens the burden on your device resources, and is still pretty darn good. Point is, I discovered something useful by just reading a little. A lot of the things I see some users complain about are easily solved, or operator error. Anything else is being reviewed, and I have no reservations about trusting fixes will come soon.

 
If you’re ready to take the step forward into the bright future of iOS music production, click
 
 
to be directed to Auria in iTunes

I highly recommend Auria for iPad 2&3 users. I’ve not experienced Auria on iPad 1.

 

UPDATED 1-28-13

Since I wrote the above review after Aurias initial release a lot has changed.
They’ve added numerous professional plug ins to the mix further improving on the already excellent capabilities. More are likely to come as things progress. Check out my separate series of “Auria FX & Plug Ins Reviews” for more on those.
This iDAW is really the only one of its kind on iOS. Yes there are other breeds of good iDAW types, but none have the audio quality, processing capabilities, FX, and tools to do a complete production at Aurias level.
That said, Auria is by no means perfect, or a full desktop DAW replacement. It is closing the gap more than anything else on iOS.
The biggest problems are with CPU and memory.
I’m using iPad 3, and find I can get by just fine without any serious troubles. iPad 4 is probably more desirable. iPad 2 can eek by, but with a lot more restrictions requiring more patience. iPad 1 will probably burst into flames on start up?

Now with Audiobus support Auria has taken another fine leap forward making the workflow more of a great pleasure. I don’t know about you but I’ve had quite enough of AudioCopy/Paste.
With that added convenience, so comes even more strain on device resources. WaveMachine Labs suggests using iPads 3&4. iPad 2 can do it, but in small doses.

There’s some bugs still.
Every new update brings dozens of fixes, improvements, and additions. Crashes can happen if care is not exercised in how much is being done at one time. Most bugs are minor but frustrating nonetheless. This is a very complex program, & its still early for Auria. You can be confident in its development.
Its not difficult to squeeze a lot from Auria. Track freeze! This helps a lot on all devices.
When using plug ins or FX, just freeze those tracks at every opportunity. Unfreezing is very quick, so going back and forth is really a minor issue. This becomes especially important on iPad 2 and even more so when using Audiobus. For that matter when using Audiobus with Auria, it is advisable to bypass all FX, in addition to freezing any tracks not in use for the recording session.
That’s what I do, and its not a problem.

If you have any problems visit the forum for help. Its given lots of attention by knowledgable end users and the development team is very active.

UPDATED 4-5-13

The main complaints I’ve seen that aren’t operator error relate to the interface. “Clunky, choppy, sluggish” are some of the words I’ve heard uttered in regard to Aurias GUI. Much of it hasn’t bothered me personally, but I can see what people mean. Some things that are most odd to me would be the loads of drop downs, and menus to make selections of functions that would be better served by multi touch support. Now, Auria is starting to improve in this area with the addition of automatic region duplication by touching the end handle. This makes the chore no longer a chore where duplicating is concerned.
Another new feature is Time Stretch. Also enabled by multi touch. WaveMachine labs clearly considered Time Stretching seriously and chose the DIRAC algorithm which is known to be very good. After using it myself I must agree. Though I’m not fond of the first and second touch on the handle to activate it. Sometimes it doesn’t work because I time the first then second touch wrong. It does work though. Imported samples are time stretch automatically. Nice! I happen to think a single touch and drag would be better. At any rate these two new features are greatly appreciated and needed.
Additional improvements have been made to the Audibus functionality. Thank you!
Real time scrubbing has also been added. Again using multi touch to activate.
There’s other thngs, improvements and bug squashings, but these are the most note worthy of you ask me.
MIDI is surely in the nearer future. I’m just glad they are listening to user feedback and showing with solid actions that they hear you.
Auria is taking the right steps in the right direction. Very encouraging.

iOS Music Apps That Made 2011

iOS Music Apps That Made 2011
It’s been a busy, fun, exciting year for iOS music app development.  There were great new discoveries, and amazing big updates that showed off what our iOS devices can do musically. I don’t think it’s an “If” any longer regarding capability. Now it’s just about “How”! How we use all these great new tools and amazing music apps with our chosen devices. It’s time not only to reflect and recall what moved us this past year in so many ways musically and artistically, but to also believe that big, professional, quality sounds can be crafted to create big quality music in many genres that can equal a big studio sound.
This past year in iOS music has really leaped forward, cementing the proof that big sound can come from tiny sources, and you do not have to invest in big studio gear, or powerful computers. It’s a revelation of how music is made, and mobility is one of the larger aspects that attract so many people. Virtual Core MIDI & Background Audio are becoming increasingly useful and in my case vital. Will VCM replace ACP?
Will developers increase their support of truly mobile music by removing all requirements for external tethering? Will we see a full fledged (Not really very likely with current iOS hardware) DAW?
Who knows? I do hope the answer in 2012 is yes all around, especially the mobility part. These are mobile devices; requiring wires or external hardware to fully utilize them is old-time thinking that slaps mobility in the face. Perhaps the hardware isn’t ready yet for all the things we might hope for, but surprises continue to prove the doubter wrong all the time.
What follows is a short list of the music apps I think took iOS music to the next level in 2011. It’s been a huge struggle to choose, but it came down to what really got used the most on my iPad, and iPod Touches.
So here goes my iOS Music Apps That Made 2011:

Drum Machine of the year. – Finger Lab brought us The Drum Machine DM-1
Full of the best that history has offered us in hardware drum machines and then some. Loaded with possibilities, ease of use, and crazy fun. Even without ACP it’s hard to deny its greatness.

Audio Editor of the year- Reforge Wave Form Editor by Audio Labs.
Simple, fast, and gets the job done. Despite some stability issues, Reforge became my number one editor for my audio bits. No clutter, and light on FX, yet reliable and clean. That’s what kept me coming back to Reforge the most in 2011.
Sequencer of the year- iSequence HD from Beep Street.
This is one I discovered rather late in the game, but almost instantly became my preferred go to for detailed sequencing.
Sampler of the year- SampleWiz. From Wizdom Music.
Creating, sampling, re-sampling, tweaking and all in all one of the more unique interfaces I’ve seen. This made sampling fun.
MIDI Controller of the year- Sound Prism Pro by Audanika. This is how wireless is done! With beautiful design, and complex chord progressions, virtual controller and much more. This is just amazing. The Virtual Core MIDI app.
 
Synthesizer of the year- Addictive Synth by VirSyn Software
This was the hardest to choose. In the end it came down to just what got used the most from my collection of iOS synthesizers. Addictive offers so much functionality and possibilities. Not shy on power and complexity, but not difficult to use.
MultiTrack Recorder of the year- MultiTrack DAW by Harmonic Dog
Even before the addition of Reverb and Delay, this app with the 24 tracks has been my work horse for arranging most of my music, including %70 of my album Technopolis Lost. Nothing works more reliably, delivering professional audio, and leads in the user friendly department. This is quality.
Studio/iDAW/all in one music production app of the year:  Nano Studio
Thanks to Blip Interactive for the monumental updates bringing Nano Studio from 6 track cool to iPad Native, and 16 (via IAP) track bliss! With programmable TRG pads galore, powerful Eden Synths, great FX, mixing,  editing, easy wireless sharing, and more all wrapped into one Nano package.

iOS Music App Of 2011- Animoog By Moog Music Inc.
Of all the amazing new music apps (including those updated in during the year) Animoog arrived with a huge bang. Maybe not the very first, but certainly one of the very best professional music apps to ever grace both the iPad and iPod Touch screens. A unique retro interface designed for functionality and with an expressive use of the touch surface. This was one of many new amazing iOS synths, and music apps that stood out sonically. Entirely usable, and perfectly beautiful, Animoog is a game changer.

Here’s to all the great music apps of 2011, and cheers to a what was a big year for iOS music.
 I know some big developments are going to show up in the new year, and there’s lots to be excited about for 2012!

Thank you.