iOSmusic

“100” A Personal Retrospective

Everyone has a story. When, why, and how they came to appreciate iOS for creating music has many different perspectives. So much has happened and changed since I started. This is my (first) 100th blog post, and I will share some of my story from before I started blogging, through today and the future of iOS Music as I see it. At the very bottom of this is a little gift of some custom Nave patch banks I made. Enjoy.

Its been more than 4 years now that I’ve been enjoying the iOS Music ride.
I’ve watched it all grow from a cool curiosity with potential to a full blown serious music production option.
When I got my first iPod Touch I had no idea what would unfold, or how much my life would change.
I had already given up on pursuing my passion for making music ages ago. I sold all of my guitars, abandoned my hopes of buying a modern, high end synthesizer, and laughed at the notion of using computers to make music. It was final. I was not ever going to be able to let the ideas I had for music out of my head.
It was all just too damned expensive. I couldn’t ever justify spending thousands of dollars on even the basic gear I would have needed. So I forgot about it and let that dream just die. Sure there is always a way, but the timing and events in my life always made it impractical.

One day with my new iTouch in hand I was checking out the App Store for new games, when on a whim I checked the “Music” category for the first time. I saw an app called “LoopTastic”. The description sounded very interesting and fun. So I downloaded it.
That first hour with the app was a ton of fun for me. More than just fun, it felt like something very special was happening. I was feeling creative and inspired. It was all just a bunch of pre-made loops that I was arranging, but it sparked something in me.
Playing with loops was fun, but it didn’t take long before I wanted to make my own stuff. So I started visiting the App Store music section more and more. Hexatone was the first instrument type app I bought. That summer of 2009 was an extremely exciting and inspirational time of exploring new possibilities. More and more apps were popping up with more and more creative possibilities.
Long story short, I created an alias for myself and started recording mixes of loops, and recordings I made from other apps all together. I called myself “Sounds Off Center” and eventually made a MySpace page to put the mixes I was making on.
I called my first digital album “Box Thought” and printed a few CDs to give to friends and family. Nothing special.
“Sounds Off Center” and “Box Thought” were quickly pushed aside in favor of pursuing a more refined musical production. I had actually forgotten about that until I was reminded by a fellow iOS music enthusiast about its existence. I was inspired and motivated to do this by an old professional musician friend of mine, who thought what I was doing was very cool, and sounded great. He was starting his label up and looking for new and interesting things. I was stunned when he suggested signing with him and then, under his tutelage learning techniques and whatnot, he would release my first all iOS made album. That was extremely flattering to me coming from him, so I started to really take things seriously at that point. Why not, right?
“SmiteMatter” was born. For those who don’t know or are curious, the name “SmiteMatter” came from my lifelong love of the old 70s anime “Star Blazers” AKA “Space Battleship Yamato”.
The iPad still didn’t exist yet, but I was planning to make a full album using that iPod Touch with all the music apps I was accumulating. Everything was happening so fast!
Music apps were getting more sophisticated and rapidly evolving. Music Studio was the first “serious” music production app I owned. Then NanoStudio and BeatMaker. Nano would occupy most of my time creating music in the palm of my hand. Beat Maker seemed like it would be great, but I hated the interface and never wanted to use it. It just made me miserable, and that’s not a good feeling to have while trying to enjoy oneself.
I was happily using iTunes File Share, and wi-fi to move recordings but wishing for something more immediate. AudioCopy/Paste was a hack, but it became very important in the absence of any wireless alternatives.
As the apps were becoming more sophisticated, I couldn’t believe how inexpensive they still were. I was using them to make music that would have cost tons more any other way. So even though at the time this was relatively the more difficult of options, it was by far the most affordable. Not to mention the huge potential.
Then the iPad came out.
That further revolutionized the whole concept of electronic music, at least for me.
By today’s standards it was very underpowered, yet for the time, powerful enough to get more complex productions done. AudioCopy/Paste was essential in my workflow. I abandoned “File Share” and never looked back. “Say no to wires” became my motto. The mobile flexibility was hugely attractive to me. Having the ability to go where ever I wish and create some tunes was, and still is a big deal. Going to a local park, the forest, or even nearby Mt.Rainier would become my studios. My music studio was anywhere I happen to be. All without any electrical power support. Trees don’t have electrical outlets so being forced to stop everything to plug in just to move files was incredibly irritating to me. It disrupted the creative process for no good reason. I could not understand why music apps were even being made without ACP? It made no sense to me at all.
I heard some reasons from some developers about why they were not using ACP in their apps, but their reasons, while logical (I suppose) at the core, were silly when clearly (to me) the big picture was about mobility and convenience. Making customers stop everything to sync their device in order to move a recording from one app to another seemed cruel. ACP was certainly not ideal, but it did get the job done. It worked. It was all we had then. A choice is always better than no choice at all. At any rate something better was desperately needed.

With the added power of that first iPad we started to see more iDAWs. Since Music Studio was still without ACP, I abandoned it in favor of more flexible work stations.
I got Studio HD, and Multitrack DAW to create my mixes. NLog Synth Pro was my main synth workhorse, and is still a favorite synth now. Other often used apps at the time included Xenon, MorphWiz, ThumbJam, Twisted Wave and iMS20. Half of the music for my official first album “Technopolis Lost” was made using my iPod Touch, and the rest came with that first iPad.

I started blogging reluctantly several months before my album released. It was something I didn’t want to do, but a respected friend was adamant that I should. So I did it. He had suggested I write all about what I was doing. That idea bored the shit out of me. After a few experiments figuring out what to blog about I settled on a combination of reviews and my own experiences. I didn’t want to do anything that I didn’t think I could do well. Ill never forget the first few comments I got with the earliest blog experiments. “You’re an idiot” by: Anonymous, and “You just squandered all the legitimacy you earned with that Sunrizer Synth review, by spreading that (something about a new iPad release date) rumor” or something like that, from “Robert”. I guess I made a comment that really pissed off a couple folks? I did not want to make people angry, so I made it a point to not write reviews of anything I didn’t like or know about. Keep it positive, and waste no time with the negative, seems to be the best philosophy.

While I was finishing up “Technopolis Lost” there was a flurry of new, increasingly powerful and capable music apps being released. Additionally I was discovering existing apps like MoDrum, while new ones like, Garage Band Mobile, Sunrizer, and Addictive Synth came out, raising the bar. They just kept coming or being discovered, constantly changing things for me. Apps were changing my life as much as they were changing music production. Garage Band Mobile excited me right away, but that excitement soon faded when I found it couldn’t do much for me. Too many limitations and initially no ACP. It was inefficient, and I gave up on it.

Virtual Core MIDI was making many things much easier, but it wasn’t really anything I was using often. I had always preferred to do everything with audio.
Nevertheless, MIDI capability had been there for much of the infancy.
I hated the idea of connecting anything by wire, and as time went on would continue using only my iOS devices and apps for all of my music. ACP was still very important, but becoming more and more unappealing to me. I wanted to stream audio from one app to the other. I wanted something much like what was found on computers with DAWs and VSTs. Basically a virtual audio cable to and from apps. Why was it taking so long? It drove me crazy having to rely heavily on ACP when it seemed so obvious that someone should and could make an app to bridge the gap between apps. It wasn’t easy, but I had gotten by with ACP, and finished “Technopolis Lost” which released October 2011. Much of it without many of the tools or features we have today.

I had been hearing (still do, but I am kind of bored with that bullshit now) of course that a large number of people considered iOS in regards to music production to be nothing more than a novelty, or just “toys”. Some people thought well of my album and production. I heard from people who thought it was amazing on its own musical merits, but some also added it was especially good since it was all done without any hardware or computer aid.
Oddly a few people insisted there was no way I made that whole album using only my iDevices and apps. I took that as a compliment, but a couple were pretty harsh about it. Harsh in that they would accuse me of lying and that I must’ve used some computer DAW and or other pro hardware. It was the accusation questioning my honesty that hurt. Well, nothing I can do about it. The truth is the truth. Funny thing is, they insist it can’t be done because the “sound and production quality is beyond the capabilities of the devices and apps,” I did in fact use. Man, get your head around that. If anyone can, I’d like to know how to make sense of such crazy talk.
Whatever the case. It can be done. I did it. Others have done it. You can do it too.

Animoog came out, taking things to a new level, and pissed me off because my album had just released! Oh boy what a major kick in the pants Animoog gave me! Then later that year BeatMaker 2 came along. I bought it immediately despite no iPad native support. It looked like the interface was cleaned up a lot, and had an impressive list of features. I ended up disliking it albeit a little less than BM1. StudioHD and Multitrack DAW would continue being my go-to production apps while cleaning up my recordings with more apps like “Reforge” and “Twisted Wave”.

Then iPad 2 came along. Much more powerful and faster than the iPad 1, it became my main workhorse and for a while my iPad 1 was my secondary device. That was when I stopped using my iPod Touch regularly.
When I finally got myself that iPad 2, Apple announced iPad 3 shortly after. Damn it. So I bought an iPad 3 a few months after it came out.
It was about then that I felt iOS Music was really on the verge of becoming widely acceptable as a serious option. Not just as it had been already for me, but to a much larger audience. The apps were outstanding, and floods of new people were joining in. In July 2012 Auria hit me like a ton of bricks and I was sure it would be “the” thing to push everything into mainstream. Oops, that didn’t happen as I expected. It did show off the incredible possibilities, and high quality audio I was sure more “pros” would perk up to. It had full automation, high quality EQ, FX, and real plug in support too. The first (for iOS) convolution reverb too.
It also showed off how far behind the devices were. A very powerful app for a very underpowered generation of devices. Still no inter-app audio connectivity. ACP was still a necessary evil and while helping me get my job done, it was holding back the whole concept of mobile music being taken seriously. It really was sounding like the biggest detractor was the inability to connect apps.
In contrast to the disappointments my eagerness to continue was unhindered seeing only the huge potential and making it work as best as I could. Clearly “we” were progressing.

There was no end in sight for increasingly powerful and innovative music apps.
PPG started developing for iOS, as did Steinberg Media. Cubasis was another big iDAW. Although it has a great interface, it’s a castrated beast without automation, quality FX and no mastering tools to be taken seriously. Yet.
More major brands were creating more serious emulations of old hardware, and or totally new apps. We had Yamaha, Korg, ImageLine, and Moog among other big names. They seemed to be taking this all seriously, but there was still a lot of resistance among many musicians.

Then iPad 4 came out on the heels of the iPad 3 release. Are you effing kidding me Apple? Sigh. At least it had a faster CPU and every improvement helps, but small incremental improvements aren’t enough. Nevertheless I bought one a couple months after Audiobus was born.
OH RIGHT! Audiobus. With the end of 2012 came the beginning of one of the most important music apps seen to date. After long months of rumor, speculation, and impatient would-be customers, it finally arrived. Excuse me here but, HOLY SHIT! The solution to inter-app audio connectivity was here, and it works! Mostly.
“The Bus” would sweep many off their feet, myself included. No more stupid iTunes File Share! No more hack work around, AudioCopy/Paste! Now making music on our iPads would be just like on a computer. Play the synth running through some FX, being recorded by an iDAW. Sweet! Mostly.
I said “mostly” twice. You probably wonder why? I mean that, to get the best results while using Audiobus, it depends a lot on what other apps are being used, and on which device. Forget about iPad 1. Be ready for some pains with iPad2. Start getting comfortable with iPad 3. Finally, have the best possible experience with iPad 4. That’s not the end all be all, and I’m generalizing a bit. Specifically, that’s how I’ve seen and experienced things. There are numerous combinations of apps and devices that vary wildly from one example to the next. So mostly, its all good. It’s definitely better than before.
However AudioCopy/Paste isn’t dead. Many people are still using it with no problems happily. Sometimes I find myself using it for certain circumstances. The thing is, there’s a choice now for most users, that’s a good thing.

This year, 2013 is reaching its sunset. We have had some spectacular new apps arrive, older ones updated with Audiobus support during and a bit before the year’s start. NanoStudio, iPolySix, EchoPad, Samplr, PPG WaveMapper, Turnado, Audio Mastering App, Magellan, Waldorf – Nave, Propellerhead Softwares, Thor Polysonic Synth. Arturia brought us an emulation of the MiniMoog with the “iMINI” synth app. More and more. Getting better and better. What we have today compared to when this all started is a big jump.
Not just big named developers with their big brands, but a magnificent collection of independent developers continue to bring us outstanding new apps and advancements. Each for tiny asking prices.
Having tolerated the cheap reverbs over these years we now have at least 3 high quality stand-alone reverb apps. More to come? Well there are definitely going to be more stand-alone FX apps. Elephant Candy released the sweet “Ultra Phaser” effects app. Kymatica is working on a delay unit called “DUB” to add to its expanding AUFX series.
Not just FX, but more complete audio mastering suites are coming. There’s exciting development of new synths, iDAWs and countless other highly useful new music apps. Never a dull moment.
We really do have everything we need including continued development.

We want more.
From the beginning I always wanted more. I’ve experienced the beginning of it all and throughout I’ve enjoyed seeing all the advancements pushing things further ahead. Change is good. Anyone involved in iOS music at any level whether starting today, or started 4 (or more) years ago, will want something more. What will come next? What do we need? Since I’ve been writing all of this from my own personal perspective I’ll chime in with a bit of what my vision is for the ideal future.
First we need a much more powerful iPad. I get by fine with what is available today, but I’m not fooling myself into believing the current level of power is sufficient. At least not if all of this is to finally be taken seriously by the resistant and so-called “pros”. We are beyond the “toy” phase I think. Probably have been for a while. There is a lot that can be done now, and at a high level. Unfortunately more is still needed.
I don’t think its unrealistic to envision an iPad with at least a 2ghz CPU, with 2 GB ram and a stereo microphone jack. It should include at least one USB port and lightning port. Pressure (wishing here) sensitivity. An iPad “Pro” maybe? I don’t know what that processor would be, but I’m sure the technology exists in some way or another that could be made to work. It would be a nice start for the next gen. iPads, I think.
I see the future of app development bringing more innovative ways to make music.
Some brand new synths, not more analogue emulations are needed. Though I wouldn’t turn down any classic remakes.
We need a full blown DAW. I don’t care who makes it, but I want it.
We do not need more half assed iDAWs that do not have decent FX, Mastering Tools, full MIDI support, and Automation.
I don’t know about you, but I’ve had it with new music apps being released without Audiobus support. Maybe after iOS 7 arrives with the speculated solution of Inter-App Audio integration which, speculated or not, is highly desirable for the future of iOS Music. It would be very nice if it were to allow audio & MIDI to transmit from one device to another via WiFi or Bluetooth. Maybe it will, or maybe it will later?Eventually it’ll have to. I’d like to be able to play a synth on one while the other is recording it wirelessly.
iTunes File Share must not ever again be the only way to move files in any music app. That was OK in 2009, but today (or even 2 years ago) it’s flat out useless.
We need apps sold in tiers to have the “Pro” tiered version include all features, no IAPs. It sells at a premium, so it should come with all premium features. Always.

This being my 100th blog post is to me much like iOS Music in general. Its early. There is much more to come.

I honestly believe this is the future of music and will be very commonplace in the near future. Technology will make most anything possible in time. Having a way to be creative that is both high quality and affordable is something we all need. This didn’t exist in my 20s or 30s. OK, 38 it did. That’s a lot of years being unable to have an outlet, wasted. I hope nobody ever has to shelve their creative desires again. Making music is not an exclusive club for “some”. It is a right for all. There is always plenty of room for more people to join in the fun and express their musical ideas without requiring huge amounts of money for the tools. iOS Music is now, and so long as the quality keeps pace, will be, one of the greatest things to ever happen to music.

Lets all keep happening!

Thank you for reading: “100” A Personal Retrospective.
I hope you enjoyed my hundredth blog post sharing my personal take and experiences, on all of this through my eyes.
I couldn’t include everything I wanted to without this being a lot longer. I am a bit nervous sharing as much as I did. Its pretty long as is even after much editing, so I sincerely hope you found this a worthwhile read? If you have anything to add, please do comment. This isn’t all just about me. I am very interested in your story, or thoughts. Thank you. See ya at 101!

Its not a big deal, but as a small token of my appreciation a special 2 banks of custom patches I made for Nave is free to download via Dropbox.
SmiteMatter 100 part 1 Nave
SmiteMatter 100 part 2

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AD 480 Pro – Reverb App Review

AD 480 Pro

Developed By: Fiedler Audio

Available in iTunes App Store

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They said you can’t get a high quality reverb on iOS. They said you can’t do a lot of things with iOS. They were right to some extent, but that was a while ago. Now of course a very large number of high quality tools & options exist for making professional quality music productions.
iOS Reverb options had been difficult to defend and honestly refer to as “professional” or “high quality” for a while. With increased device power (still relatively underpowered) and evolving development, the past several months have seen a boom in high powered music apps of all sorts.
Now AD480 Pro has come along to offer us a very nice quality stand alone reverb app. This is not your Grandmas “FreeVerb”.

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You probably know by now that I love Reverb. If you didn’t, well, now you do. Reverb is a powerful effect giving most any sound a boost in warmth, depth, and wideness. Its very useful, and found nearly everywhere in music. It is a power hungry effect. Which is why early iOS music apps could never really deliver a high quality option. There was even a time when professionals would laugh at the idea of a digital reverb emulation ever being possible. Of course computers have rapidly moved forward and had numerous digital Reverb options at a very high quality standard for years. iOS however is just beginning to join the party.

AD480 Pro is the first high end, stand alone reverb app to hit the App Store, but not the very first high quality or professional reverb option (See my Auria – Plug Ins & FX review series) available to iOS musicians. But, this is about stand alone FX apps, so I’ll stay on track.
This really does sound amazing!
AD480 Pro is a unique algorithm created by Future Audio, inspired by legendary reverb units such as “Lexicon” and the likes. They wanted to develop a reverb that can reproduce any acoustic space imaginable. Furthermore they wanted to make it easy to use with a bevy of adjustable parameters and routing options for the user to manipulate to their liking.
I think they were successful on all counts with AD480 Pro.

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AD480 Pro has a great sound. A really great sound! It is fully Audiobus compatible supporting “Input”, “Effects” and “Output” slots.
It is easy to use in any situation such as playing live, in the studio, a park or practically anywhere. There’s no shortage of possibilities to create a wide margin of reverberation effects.
Having control over Hi/Lo filter frequencies, levels, dampness, cutoffs, spread, mix, and many more parameters will offer you a multitude of sound types. With 108 presets covering a wide spectrum of sounds, there’s plenty of stuff ready to go and or build off of. Create and save your own patches and banks for easy use another time.
The cross feed parameters have a powerful effect, but may not always be necessary. I had been experimenting with these and hearing some added metallic sounds I wanted no part of.
So I asked Future Audio about it and here is what they said:
“The cross feed parameter group was introduced to allow a well defined behavior of the reverb for stereo signals which are not located in the middle of the panorama but much more on the left or right statically. If you have a sound like a nice broad stereo pad or similar things you actually don’t need that parameter group unless you intend to produce some special effect.”

That was a helpful explanation. It made so much sense to me that I felt silly asking the question.
It goes to show you that they are very proud of AD480 Pro and eager to help.

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There’s no shortage of routing options for MIDI uses, and under the hood is a mighty engine. Here are some additional features at a glance:
24 input and output channel routing matrix.
Internal/ external USB class compliant audio interfaces supported.
Full MIDI communication support via network, & USB-MIDI & internal (virtual) MIDI.
Super low latency from 64 samples up.
Sample rate support for 44.1 to 96 kHz
Low Light Mode – Looks pretty cool by the way.
And more.

There are plenty of functions and parameters available to explore the world of reverb.
Nothing fancy like modulations, tuning, or springs etc, but plenty to make excellent sounding reverb space effects. Space, as in a space like a room, not deep space. You can however create deep space reverb sound effects though. Imagine a star destroyers massive hanger bay after all the fighters departed. Vast! It can be done as big or small, cold or warm as you want.
I had no instances where I felt I was unable to achieve the sound I was looking for. When I wanted a warm feel or a deep space chill, it was no problem. I never felt like I was using some old cheap sounding FreeVerb algorithm. What I’ve been hearing from AD480 Pro has been very satisfying and truly professional sounding. I’ve not experienced any crashing even when using Audiobus with this, an input and an output app. Its been stable on both my iPads 3&4.
My only complaints are there’s no recording function, & no AudioCopy/Paste. That dings the convenience factor in my opinion. My other stand alone reverb app is much better for recording directly into it, and or importing and exporting samples between other apps without having to rely on Audiobus or bounce around from app to app.
I was also a little disappointed in the lack of a chorus or other modulation parameters considering the price. Some modulation options might be added, and more presets at a later time, but as IAPs.
I get the IAP for modulation, but for presets? The following in this paragraph alone has been edited with additional content Maybe its because I do my own sound design, and find the parameters of this app to be pretty strait forward, but selling presets in this case just seems silly to me. Just my opinion. Maybe its a great idea to offer professionally designed presets via IAP? Could it be a good value for folks who either don’t feel comfortable trying to make their own, or just don’t want to spend the time? What do you think? Leave a comment, Id love to hear your thoughts, and I think the developer might appreciate it as well?

Minor gripes aside, its about the quality of the app and AD480 Pro oozes quality. Considering that a comparable desktop plug in would cost many times more than this, AD480 is a good value. Just a little inconvenient in certain situations.

Recommended.

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Master Record – App Review

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Master Record
Developed By: Igor Vasiliev iMusicAlbum

Available in iTunes App Store HERE

Remember when you had to put an audio cassette tape in your old Tascam PortaStudio to record music? Remember the warm hiss that analogue tape added? You don’t? Really? Yikes, I’m really showing my age I guess.

Well anyway, before technological advances that brought us luxuries like gravity, oxygen, and iPads, we had to record our music up hill! Both ways, when I was young! Dag nabbit!
Now we have insanely easy ways to record. No more tapes, reels, or whatever. No more unwanted noise.

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So now we have “Master Record” available for us to enjoy recreating the noisy analogue tape recordings from yesteryear. But, why?
Turns out there are plenty of folks who appreciated the warm hiss that tape forced upon us. With this app though, that noise is completely under the users control. You can crank it up and have your recordings sound like they were done behind a waterfall, or remove it completely. Whatever you want.

Master Record is a convenient way to record just about anything, from any audio source. Wherever you choose. It works with the iRig Mic (among many other mics) and is Audiobus compatible with the Effect and Output slots. Import or export using AudioCopy/Paste, Open In, Internal web service via WiFi and of course iTunes File Share. Moving recordings to and from Master Record is covered well. It needs Dropbox support though.

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More than anything this app is best suited for adding analogue tape sound effects, rather than a go to recorder. It can warm up recordings with its 4 unique analogue tape noise emulations, and its “Tape Saturator” with 3 variants. There are also the “Flutter” effects with 3 frequency types and a basic 2 band shelf EQ for input corrections. So there’s plenty of options to manage and create the desired effects.
The “Flutter” however really doesn’t seem to do anything at all. I’ve tried maxing it in several experiments with various audio, but it has no noticeable effect on anything.
I suppose the effects this app generates are meant to be subtle, and very specific. In regards to that, it does a great job. So don’t go in expecting to get anything but analogue tape effects out of Master Record.

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Master Record has a nice waveform view screen which also provides an environment to adjust fades. 3 envelope fade types ( just like in the Audio Mastering App which looks nearly identical to this app) to choose from and detailed positioning with pin point accuracy.
This is simply a recording app, but it would benefit from some editing tools. That would boost its appeal, making it much more useful and practical. As a stand alone recorder with no wave editing, that for the most part doesn’t do much except produce a niche sound type, Master Record has me on the fence whether or not to recommend it widely.

Yes! This does do a very good job with emulating analogue tape noise, has dubbing, a good array of tweakable parameters for warming recordings and adding body. But that’s about it. This is one of those very specific “job-type” apps. If you really want to have an excellent way to reproduce certain tape sound types, and make perfect digital recordings sound more natural, then look no further. If you don’t have a strong desire for this specific sound, then you probably won’t have much need for this particular app.

EarWizard

EarWizard
By Wizdom Music
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EarWizard releases July 11 2013

Wizdom Music has been designing music apps for iOS a long while now. Jordan Rudess is one of the more recognizable names in music to start with and even more so among those who enjoy iOS as a creative option. We are used to seeing innovative music apps we can use as instruments or controllers from the Wizdom Music team.
EarWizard is something different and, at least speaking for myself, unexpected.
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EarWizard is a fun learning tool that helps one become familiar with scales & keys using a take on “Simon”. This makes the presentation of EarWizard as a game of sorts immediately understandable. It is familiar and fun while being educational at the same time.
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I don’t think I need to describe how “Simon” works, but I will describe how EarWizard puts its own spin on things. The concept is simple: you can change the key and game speed from the settings or begin with a tutorial.
You start off in a particular scale and key. Then select a level. Instead of boring sequences of increasingly complicated tones that must be repeated perfectly, there are windows displaying a short video of Jordan playing a chord. Starting off slowly and then progressing to a more complex series of chords to repeat. Easy enough.
Each correct interaction is followed by a pleasant audible indication. Make a mistake and you’ll hear about it with out of tune chords. A clear indication an error has been made.
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As you play through it becomes more and more challenging. I found that along the way I had been learning to recognize keys. Such is the benefit of this game.
What really kept my attention other than just trying to concentrate on recognizing each key, was the videos of Jordan. He makes different facial expressions for each video where he strikes a chord on a piano. They range from benign to hilarious. I found myself a little distracted at times because I ended up laughing at the expressions he would make. I mean this as a compliment. It kept me interested and always looking forward to seeing what he would do next.
I really thought that was a great idea, and it works for me. You really gotta just see it for yourself.

EarWizard is a fun way to either develop or exercise an existing skill and have some fun while at it.

EarWizard was tested on iPad 3 & 4

Additional Screen Shots

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Galileo Organ – Review

Galileo Organ
Developed By: Yonac Inc

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Organs in general don’t usually pique my curiosity, much less much interest. Don’t get me wrong, they can bring something special to music, and many classics like Pink Floyd have immortalized the sound. I’ve tried some emulations on iOS, but haven’t ever felt like they offered much, and besides with a little effort most Organ sounds can be made in some of my synths.
Galileo Organ is a whole new ball game. For the first time in my life, an Organ made for iOS has knocked my socks off. This Organ is made by Yonac who also created the monstrous Magellan Synth, so you know its going to be good.

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Galileo is a professional virtual analog Organ design able to flawlessly emulate realistic Tonewheel, Transister, with “leakage”and other styles. It is complete with 3 rotary cabinet types, at 32bit DSP.
Officially it has 11 Organ types, but with some tweaking of the many parameters it is capable of emulating pretty much any Organ in existence. I think?
Somehow they managed to squeeze 3 configurable manuals with their drawbars (Hi, Lo keyboards and Pedals) all on to one screen.
Galileo has 48 polyphony, (I’m going to need more fingers?) brake/speed & slow/fast toggles.
Configurable rotary acceleration, brightness, drum to horn balance, and stereo mic separation.
They threw in just about every Organ related bells and whistles around.
I’m not an expert on Organs so a bunch of the Organ speak, is new lingo to me. I trust my ears, and what I am hearing with Galileo sounds beautiful.

Theres tons of technical specs here, and as usual to save space I suggest you check out YonacSoftwares Blog for the whole rundown.

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Packed with 240 carefully designed presets including a bank by Sunsine, have most bases covered for whatever Organ sound you’re looking for. Does Galileo do Hammond? Yep, and like I said above, pretty much every other as well.
Patch making is where I get the most giddy, and there is plenty of room here to create and save custom patches. Banks can also be shared. Which is very nice of you want to take your creations from one iDevice and put it on another.

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Galileos arpeggiator will feel right at home to Magellan users. Even if you haven’t used Magellan (are you insane?) you’ll find this arpeggiator intuitive. You can run simple patterns, or customize your own. You have control (dedicated note buffer for each of the 3 manuals) over the Hi,Lo, keyboards and Pedals in your Arps. Gate, Octave, Swing and note repeats are also under your command.

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The FX are of a breed that you might not find in most synths, which of course should make sense as this is an Organ. Some are familiar, but others are unique to Organs. They are split into 2 FX screens.

• 4 types of Wah-Wah with adjustable sweep range & emphasis
• Autowah module w/ 5 sweep curves, 3 follow modes, velocity tracking, settable rate, phase and bpm syncing
• Ring Modulator / Tremolo with fast & slow modes and adjustable depth
• Delay, Reverb & configurable FX signal path
The signal path mentioned is a slick touch, drag, and drop window.
The FX all sound great, and I have had an especially grand time messing around with the Wah-Wah.

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Recording and managing files are well done, and again designed in a familiar manner. The “Tape” screen is swiftly navigated making it a painless experience to record, and manage. Adjustable count in, record on touch, fixed record lengths, and all your importing and exporting is done smoothly here.

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No iOS music app would be complete without Audiobus, standard sharing, and MIDI supports.
Galileo is complete with Audiobus Input, and FX slot support. General and Sonoma AudioCopy/Paste.
The MIDI implementation is robust with 3 IO channels, over 130 control destinations, keyboard splitting, sustain and expression supports etc.
All the MIDI stuff is accessed from the “Pref” screen, where you’ll also find 50 or so scales to assign whatever key you wish.
Yonac has done another bang up job with offering yet anther full and complete new music app to enjoy.

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Having enjoyed YonacSoftwares MagellanSynth for a while, it is no surprise to me that Galileo would be of the same high caliber. Its stable, clean, and sounds so damn good. I really can’t find anything to complain about. I am suddenly now a fan of Organs thanks to the sublime design and execution of this app. If you’re a die hard Organ lover, I dare say you won’t be disappointed by Galileo one bit. Even folks like me who would normally be apathetic to such instruments would find this worth a very close look. You’ll likely start looking for ways to incorporate Galileo into your music.
Its just that good.

Highly recommended. Must Have!