Killer app

Thor Polysonic Synthesizer

Thor Polysonic Synthesizer
Made by: Propellerhead Software

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Remarkable, beastly, outstanding, monstrous, unearthly, incredible, you should get this synth.
That was the easiest review ever. Not enough? What? You want me to elaborate?
Oh, alright.

Every time I see a new iOS synth I get very excited. Don’t you? Well you should. Thor is no simple or run of the mill synth. Its a port of course, but a port that still has stones. Instead of a single synthesis type, Thor has 6 oscillator types! What? Yes 6. Analog, FM Pair, Wavetable, PhaseMod, Multi Oscillator, and Noise. Its can make for some nutty but thunderous combinations depending on how you apply them to the 3 available slots.
Add to the incredible selection of synth types, there’s 4 filter types for 3 slots. Then there’s a whole mess of routing options and modulations to dig into. It is a mind blowing collection of options that can lead to some of the most creative synth sounds imagined. Thor is godlike.
Kind of getting ahead of myself here, so ill expand in the order of the interface screens next.

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The functions and parameters that all make up Thor being numerous and complex, are thoughtfully contained in 3 main screens with collapsible and expandable sections. It might seem at a glance like there’s too many hoops to go through in order to make an adjustment, but what’s the alternative? Ive seen some complaints about this. When you think about it and understand how much stuff there is packed into Thor, those complaints boil down to being just nit picky, and painfully trivial. If everything were visible without consolidating, the interface would be a big mess full of tiny buttons, knobs and itty bitty text. What Propellerhead did to keep everything neat, clean and accessible works out nicely.

First is the “Keyboard” screen.
Pretty strait forward and self explanatory. This is where the performing is done. Select Mono or Polyphonic with adjustable portamento. There are 2 assignable rotary knobs and buttons. Adjustable pitch bend, modulation, and strum sliders reside on this screen. The Strum slider is fairly unique to synths & works as you might think. Hold a key or keys and strum away or tap “Hit” for a stab. It all can make for some unique play styles when applied together during recording or performance.
Also on this screen is the “Assist” function which is used to select scales and keys.
It all comes together smashingly for a very satisfying experience.

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Next we have the “Knobs” screen. This is where the magic happens. As I mentioned previously, you have 3 slots to apply any combination of the 6 oscillator types. 3 filter slots for the 4 available filter types, a “Shaper” unit with 9 shapes, a mixer, and all the routing. Plus there are 3 envelops and 2 LFOs.

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You might think it could get pretty crowded with all of these tools, and if it weren’t for the “Expand” function to help control space it would be.
Each piece has additional options for waveforms, speeds, types, in the form of drop down menus neatly contained within each unit. The sound designing capabilities are astronomical. Nothing has been diluted or compromised here at all.
With so many synthesis types available to combine with one another it could seem like Thor is a student of many but master of nothing. That would be an error. Each type can be controlled in great detail. The WaveTable for example is loaded up with many wavetable types for you to select from. No you can’t make your own wavetable, but there’s plenty to choose from. The 4 filter types Comb, LoPass Ladder, State Variable and Formant can be used in any combination (like the oscillators) in 3 separate slots. How you combine and route each of these will offer some sonic dimension that few synths can approach. Thor’s FX units are Delay and Chorus, and pretty darn good to boot.
All of your Thor creations can be moved to or from the Reason version of Thor.
The over used “playground” description seriously applies to Thor in the most sincere ways. This is really not just a playground but more like the Disneyland of sonic realms.

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The 3rd and final screen is called “Routing”. Here we have a comprehensive matrix for some massive routing and modulation options. Tweak signal flow and directions of each parameter with fine adjustments to just about anywhere. Its a relentless range of depth and possibilities. You can be as complex or simple as you wish with your routing. Additionally a micro keyboard is always available on the bottom of the “Knobs, and Routing” screens for you to audition your creations.

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In addition to the matrix on this Routing screen is a 16 step sequencer. One of the more detailed I’ve seen in a synth allowing fantastic control over each note, 2 curves, velocity, gate, and step durations. Select the order, skip notes, change direction, and speeds etc its all there. Super slow 16/4 to light speed 1/64 speeds.

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Thor is a class act. This synth is ridiculously rich with features and capabilities. Obviously I’ve left out a lot in order to keep this all at a decent length. Check out the Propellerhead Software site for more details.
Thor supports Audiobus Input, MIDI, and background audio. It works great with my iRig Keys. There doesn’t appear to be any ACP support, and no built in recording. That will be a disappointment to those who still prefer to do things that way.

To sum it all up I’d have to say that Thor on iPad is a monumental addition to the ever increasing library of pro quality options being delivered to iOS. Thor is complete, playable, and insanely deep. Creating synth sounds with loads of character and life are just the beginning. -(*edit) In case I’m not making myself clear, the resulting sounds can be amazing. Ive been enjoying the strong sonic capabilities Thor puts in my hands. Making thick, evolving pads that breath are my favorites, but any types can be made and sound great. You get out of it, what you put into it.- With over 1000 patches built in there’s plenty of inspiring sounds to mess with, but building from the ground up is where its at. The tools are there, its up to you to make it however you like. Experiment and have fun with it. The only thing that bugs me is there’s no way to share custom patches by email, and the color scheme of GUI is drab to me. Then again I am color blind, so maybe its delightful to others?
This is the kind of synth that will keep you hooked and coming back over and over to design sounds like no other. Its behaved well for me on my iPads 3&4 with no stability issues at all. Its recommended for iPad 2 and up. Sorry iPad 1 owners.
It is a legend born from Reason and having this on our iPads is a dream come true. Synth lovers rejoice! At the time I wrote this Thor is selling for $14.99 (USD) and that’s a bargain for what you’re getting here.

Thor is available in iTunes HERE

Couple extra screen shots:

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Nave – Review

Nave
Developed By: Waldorf & Tempo Rubato

Nave is compatible with iPads 2,3 & 4

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UPDATED 6-14-13
There were a few things I left out when I originally wrote the review below. Only because I was trying to keep things short, and honestly I just forgot. However a couple are pretty important and should be mentioned.
Yes, Nave is a polyphonic and monophonic synth. It has a 4 voice unison mode with adjustable width. It gets really wide, by the way. I find myself using it a lot. As for how many voices in total polyphony is concerned, I have been unable to locate an exact number. From what I’ve experienced it has more than I have fingers. Whatever the case, its plenty.

There’s also the speach synthesis which uses the device talk to text function to create new wavetables. That’s a strange one, but awfully cool anyway. More importantly Nave allows one to import via pasteboard, their own audio files to create original wavetables. That’s sweet.

I kind of just glanced at a mention of the “UberWave” function. It adds a big fat sound quality that puts a lot of edge on it. Its hard to explain, you really just gotta hear it. Its definitely better explained by Waldorf in the manual, but again to keep this short, I’m just going to suggest you visit the Nave page of their website for that and all the tech stuff. The link is down in the review itself.

So there’s a couple more things. Sorry I didn’t mention these before. Nave has a lot of capabilities, and I can’t list them all. Most important is that Nave has an amazing sound quality for some powerful patch crafting and has become my daily synth of choice. Anyone who doesn’t get excited by this synth clearly has no pulse.

Original Review:

Synthesizers just make me happy. Incredibly powerful ones such as Nave, make my head spin with joy.
You’ve probably heard about Nave, seen the videos, or endured my merciless teasing.
Now after 1.5 years of hard work and careful development, Nave is finally finished! As I am writing this it is with Apple pending review to be launched in the iTunes App Store any time now.
I have been lucky to have had the opportunity to beta test Nave for a couple months leading up to this. From day one, I’ve been very impressed with this powerful new synth made just for iOS.
Waldorf has been making great software for a while, but this is their first for iOS. They joined with Tempo Rubato, who you may know of from the excellent NLog Synth Pro.
Pretty solid development team if you ask me.

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Nave is a powerful twin wavetable oscillator synthesizer with a single classic oscillator (with all the basic waveforms) and the pulse racing “Uberwave” function. You have hands on control over numerous options to tweak the many choices of wavetables, (in full screen “Edit” mode) 7 different 3D views. Very fine tuning is easily done by touch to fully customize any wavetable. Full ADSR envelope controls over each oscillator, 2 multi waveform LFOs, fully adjustable pitch/bend wheels and modulation options at every corner. The amount of modulation options really are nothing short of amazing.
At last count there were 500 plus factory presets being shipped with Nave at launch. Nave is pure sound design heaven!

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The integrated ( and beautifully emulated ) Waldorf Multimode Filter with the Drive function that has a selection of 5 curve types to 4 location options offer you amazing control of the wavetable oscillators to craft the wildest of imagined sounds from morphing, teeth mashing leads on overdrive steroids, to silky and mesmerizing pads. The ten source to destination modulation matrix extends sound designing possibilities dramatically. Truly limitless.

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Playing Nave on screen has a couple options. It has a classic, scrolling virtual chromatic keyboard. Then there are the “Blades” which can have x/y modulations, and velocity programmed to them giving you full polyphonic modulation control. I got caught by my wife gesturing my fingers in strange massaging motions over the Blades manipulating the sound in a way she referred to as “Romantic”.
Plugging in your MIDI controller/keyboard (iRig Keys in my case) was about as difficult as just that. Plug in, start playing. All significant parameters can be mapped and MIDI controlled either virtually or with compatible hardware.

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As for FX, Nave has that covered also. 7 effects units are onboard and sound really good. I actually like the reverb on this synth. A delay, chorus, phaser, flanger, 3 band EQ, and compressor round out the options. I have found each to sound excellent. Though, at times if I had applied the reverb with a few others and played some chords, I got a bit of clipping. Could have just been I forgot to close a background app, or the CPU on my iPad was over burdened. Lowering the amount of reverb used and set to %50 wet vs dry helped. That was on my iPad 3. No such experience was repeated on my iPad 4.

On the same page with the FX, is a competent arpeggiator with better than normal options, but still kind of basic. That’s not a bad thing. I actually like this arpeggiator better than most iOS synths. It has a fair amount of options to make some unique, and melodic patterns including your own notes. Using the arpeggiator with the 2 large programmable x/y pads adds much to experience. Nave is multi dimensional doing everything splendidly.

All in all the specification list is quite large so please check out the Waldorf website for all the details. There’s too many to list here.

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Lastly is the vintage styled 4 track recorder. You could use it to make a whole Nave song, or sketch out some things. I’m enjoying using it to layer on some interesting and varied synth sounds for creative loops. Each track can be panned, leveled, split, and or duplicated.
In loop mode (iPads 3&4) I heard some clicks where the loop ends meet, but they didn’t translate to the recording I made while using Audiobus to an output app. In addition to Audiobus input support Nave has AudioCopy/Paste, “Open In”, & Save to iTunes Folder.
I’ve had no crashes, or weird mishaps at all with this final version of Nave. They did a great job with this ambitious synth, and it is full of impressive bits all around. If anything looks confusing there is a manual accessible from the “?” button on the “Tape” screen.

The amount of tools and options for creating sounds strait from your imagination are fantastic. Nave has become one of my most favored iOS synths and I easily consider it a must have. The audio quality is second to none. This is one massive, beastly synth that raises the bar.
Whatever the price is in your iTunes Store, it is my sincere and honest opinion it’ll be worth it.

Yeah, I recommend Nave. Duh.

Here’s a couple more screen shots from the Wavetable edit full screen. You can even manipulate the colors.

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The Must Have iOS Music Apps In My Process

Updated July 24 2013

A few additions and deletions to consider in this updated list. I’ve added some really impressive new apps, as well as removing a couple I’m tired of waiting for updates.
A couple of the most notable additions is Waldorfs Nave, Nave is special, and very powerful with tremendous sonic crafting options. “Audio Mastering” app which I find to be an extremely useful, and quality mastering option. If you are using something like Cubasis then it is absolutely essential.
Thor Polysonic Synthesizer, AUFX:Space ( a fantastic stand alone reverb ), and now that Audiobus is supported MorphWiz and SampleWiz are added.

A while ago I made a similar list of iOS music apps that I generally considered “Must Have” iOS Music Apps. It got a bit long & messy. It was more of a wide look at the apps I thought had a fairly universal appeal for anyone interested in making music this way. I’m making this new list to reflect a more current collection of iOS music apps, but most specific to what is used in my own process rather than a list of options or just simply great apps. There are so many great apps.
This is a response of sorts to the questions I am asked most often about my music process.”Hey, David! What music apps do you use and recommend?” And “Why?”

First. I only require that these have Audiobus support now, or at least AudioCopy/Paste until they can be updated with Audiobus. Any music app failing to have, or a plan to soon have those basic functions, are simply not installed. At least not until they do. I am always open to revisiting other excellent music apps when they are completed with these basic supports. The reason this is so important to me is because I have always been committed to the wire-free creative experience that iOS offers.
I enjoy that freedom most and it adds to my inspiration. Wires don’t appeal to me and I feel are no longer necessary in this day and age. If I wanted wires I’d use a laptop.
iTunes File Share is dreadful and not part of my process. The rare times ill use File Share is just to move projects for storage on my computer. Lastly, I only occasionally use Virtual MIDI and own no other hardware.

What I used previously versus what I use today is very different. So much has changed. The amazing growth and development in iOS music apps available today has advanced very quickly. It is a very exciting time for me as I’m sure it is for countless others who are equally (if not more) enthusiastic about this unique platform for music production.

So for what ever its worth, here is my list of apps I consider “Must Haves” and use in my process to make music. The ones I just can’t live without.

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iDAW

Auria – The single most complete iDAW for mixing, editing & mastering from cradle to grave.

Meteor- The next best thing to Auria for professional quality. Now with up to 24 tracks via IAP. Good automation and fantastic MIDI controls. Instruments, and solid FX, but paying extra for an EQ is offensive. Still great iDAW.

Synthesizers

PPG WaveGenerator, PPG WaveMapper, Animoog, Addictive Synth, Sunrizer Synth, Magellan Synth, NLogPro, Nave, Thor, CrystalSynth XT

Sequencers

iPolySix, SynergyStudio, Cubasis

Samplers

Samplr, CsGrain, SampleWiz

Granular/Synth

GrainScience, iPulsaret, iDensity, GrainBender, Stria.

Drum and Percussion

DM1-The Drum Machine, DrumJam, Stochastic, MoDrum. GlitchBreaks

Instruments

ThumbJam, Guitarism, OMGuitar, Gelileo Organ, MorphWiz

Virtual MIDI

Gestrument, MusixPro, ArpeggionomePro, Chordion.

FX

EchoPad, Filtatron, Turnado, AUFX:Space

Miscellaneous

Impaktor, AirVox

Tie It All Together, Edit, Master Etc.

Audiobus, AudioShare, Twisted Wave, Audio Mastering.

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There you have it. A list of the iOS music apps I must have in my process. This is by no means a declaration of any kind. Everyone has a unique process with apps they prefer. I hope that answers the question some of you have asked. I’m sure this will all change tomorrow. 🙂

Auria App Review – Version 1.10

 A Truly Capable iDAW

Auria Is Made By WaveMachine Labs

Review is based on experience with Auria on iPad 3 and 4. My first experiences with Auria were on iPad 2 which I no longer have and or recommend for this app. It’ll work on iPad 2, but with great difficulties if Audiobus is in the process.
My reviewed copy of Auria was purchased at full price. I now also currently beta test Auria, but cannot write about any beta related experience.
Therefore nothing in the following review has anything to do with any beta builds of this app and all to do with my own experiences with the production version available for sale.

UPDATED 11-25-2013
Auria now supports iOS7 Inter-App Audio. It’s working beautifully so far for me. This should be the preferred method over Audiobus whenever possible since IAA operates at 32 bits floating point. Twice the depth of the 16 that Audiobus and AudioCopy/Paste operates.
It doesn’t really matter much if you’re making electronic music, but for acoustic, and vocals, recording at 32 bits is preferable to most people. All around though it’s just better than 16 in some ways many people may not even notice. Such as with clipping. There’s less chance of clipping when recording at 32, and you can be a little less meticulous with levels.
I’ve been recording 16 bits for ages and got used to it, having no significant issues. However 32 is a nice option for recording. The only down side is that projects are much larger. It seems a bit more stable with IAA as well.

UPDATED Review 9-5-2013

It’s been a little while since I’ve updated my review of Auria. It’s hard to keep up with so many apps both new and updated. A lot has changed with Auria over the months. It’s improved stability, the UI is becoming more touch oriented, and now MIDI is getting under way. It’s not fully MIDI capable today, and mostly the MIDI functions center on using Auria with external tools, but this is a good start.
They’ve added MIDI Sync with MMC, & MTC including complete MTC chase and MIDI clock options. MIDI plug ins support, and MIDI remote control for controlling Auria with Mackie MCU and HUI surfaces round out this first MIDI update.
OK, I don’t really use that stuff, and I mostly care about using Auria with “virtual core MIDI” on my iPads along with other VCM capable apps. Not yet, but not too far off in the future either. That’ll be a grand day.
Among the new MIDI capabilities Auria V1.10 has some new looks and features. Mixdown to email, snap to locators, markers, and highlight. A nice little time saver. AudioShare is now fully (finally) integrated!
There is now a handy new “Icon Bar” on the top of the editing screen. Much better than sifting through drop downs for simple tasks (like Duplicate!) that should be right there, and now it is.

There is still some lag when dragging through the timeline or moving regions. That’s driving me crazy, but tolerable since it has no relation to the sound. It’s all about the sound, but I would appreciate that being improved.

When using Auria with Audiobus this version has improved its auto track input function making the menu surfing a little less annoying. Speaking of Audiobus with Auria, I’m happy to report that stability is improved. That’s a big deal, I think because before there were many occasions where I’d finish recording a track, then touch the (from the input app) Audiobus remote to switch back to Auria, and whammo, crash, recording gone! This had been my largest concern. I never lost a whole project like I have in Cubasis, but it was a big problem that’s now fixed.

I offer the following advice based on my own experiences with Auria to have the best time using it.

Aurias stability overall can largely be controlled by you the user. First, forget about using all this on anything less than iPads 3 or preferably 4 if you want the best possible experience. When using Audiobus with Auria, be sure to disable all FX and plug ins during those sessions. If you already have some then turn them off until after the Audiobus session. Use the track freeze!
Keep the number of Audiobus inputs to a minimum. I recommend using only one input at a time through Audiobus with no more than one FX unit as often as is possible.
Always shut down background apps not currently in use. The more apps running and or assigned simultaneously in Audiobus to Auria, the more there is potential for issues. It is also a good idea to set the disk buffer to “large”. That has nothing to do with latency, and will make Audiobus recording sessions much more reliable especially with longer recordings. Do these things and you will have very few issues if any. It works for me and I’ve tested this extensively with excellent and consistent results. The largest project I have had after finishing Audiobus recording sessions, was 21 (on average my typical project is around 12-14 tracks) tracks. Then I added, Pro Q, and Timeless in the aux slots. Each track had individual standard EQing, and half of those with 1 or more plug ins, but the tracks were all frozen while working on another. Some automation was also used. No CPU or memory warnings, but it was very close to the limits on my iPad 4. If I ran more than 2 unfrozen tracks with all that, then I got low CPU. Its not magic. Though I can’t imagine how anyone could do the same with a full 48 tracks?

Auria isn’t perfect but it does work just fine, if you understand how to operate it. Plenty of people say they can’t do “anything” but somehow I have almost no troubles at all? The reason I must conclude for them, is that they do not completely understand how to use this amazing application to its fullest. Comments from users that are focussed on the problems they are having are just unfair, and results of operator error. It has to be. If I am using it without any of the major problems others claim to experience constantly with everything they try, then either I have some super natural power or they are not understanding the app. I certainly have no special powers or abilities, so my conclusion must be correct. This isn’t rocket science. Anyone can learn to use Auria. Impatience or operator error does not a bad app make.

Auria still sports the greatest selection of high quality plug ins by a wide margin. The audio capabilities are far and away the best you can get on iOS. There are still minor bugs, mostly in the UI, but since they do not effect the sound, they are (albeit annoying) tolerable. If you want the best options for the best sound, then those bugs shouldn’t matter. Like many of you I am looking forward to MIDI being fully integrated successfully. Thankfully that ball is rolling.

ORIGINAL REVIEW BELOW:

 
When I first heard of Auria I thought, “There’s no way they can do this, is there?” 
WaveMachine Labs answers with a resounding YES, offering Auria, a professional quality digital audio workstation with a great many high quality bells and whistles.
With the capability to support up to 96kHz sample rate at 24 bits, 32 or 64 bit dual precision audio processing engine, 48 stereo or mono tracks, (44.1 & 48kHz up to 24 tracks on iPad 1) your digital productions are in good hands. Designed with the future in mind Auria has support for 3rd party VST plug ins at additional charge via IAP from big names like PSP Audioware, Overloud and more.


Auria has so many features and functions, I find I’m still having those “ah ha” moments as I work with this incredible iDAW. A quick run down of the more impressive features follows. AAF import/export, audio copy paste (ACP will always result in a max bit rate of 16) drop box, (they say MIDI is under development) 8 assignable subgroups, each with two aux sends, full automation, WIST support, Auria Link to run two devices with Auria for a sync of up to 96 tracks, automatic sample rate conversion, track freeze, a comprehensive waveform editor, and so many more.

The on board included effects are very well done. A classic Reverb, Stereo Delay, Stereo Chorus, Re Tune, EQ with expander, compressor, and limiter are a must for anyone wanting to master their final mix. Last but not least my very favorite effect of all is an outstanding Convolution Reverb with a full IR library of high quality reverberation types. This is the best reverb I have experienced with iOS apps. I’ve said it many times, reverb quality is one of the more glaring disabilities of this platform. For good reason, quality reverb is a big CPU hog. You can hear the tin, thin, dull lack of quality in all the iOS reverbs, some more than others, and some are really made quite well all things considered. None however currently compare to the depth, warmth, and expansive nature of Auria’s included Convolution Reverb Plug In.
Still not quite up to desktop standards, but it’s a huge improvement. It’ll do nicely.
Thanks to track freeze, using multiple FX on multiple tracks is an option. If you don’t freeze, Auria will overburden your device CPU. No problem, it’s not permanent, unfreeze, and freeze again all you want.
 
For more about the detailed specs visit WaveMachine Labs HERE
 
The user interface is designed well for multi touch. The usual pinch, spread zoom in/out, and swipe functions are present. I have experienced some response problems here and there, but they are going to fix things in time. For now a minor annoyance.

The layout is very simple looking, but packed with tools and functions to intuitively enjoy Instead of a single fade or cross fade setting, Auria has four that each affect the fade differently. These are great for all sorts of fade type effects, and cross fading two waveforms that merge into one seamlessly, with careful placement of course. Very cool, if you ask me.

 
Initially after inquiring about beta testing I was informed by A WaveMachine Labs representative that they did not currently have an active, dedicated end user beta test team. I took concerned note of that and had reported this in my earlier version of this review. Turns out that another representative has confirmed otherwise, and that they do in fact have a strong team of beta testers currently for Auria after all. I was misinformed, or missunderstood, at any rate I am very glad to hear they do indeed currently have this in place.

At the moment its got a few minor issues regarding compatibility with other apps. The problem is that certain apps no longer work with Auria on the same device simultaneously. This began after the most recent update (from August 8th negatively affecting some popular music apps, its temporary). It happens. No one is perfect, and Auria is extremely complex. I was told the next update will probably revert Auria to the previous audio compatibility settings that will in short, be less restrictive and allow those apps to be used again on the same device. Nothing to get discouraged over. WaveMachine Labs is very attentive and eager to improve. They are very responsive and have helped me out of a few pickles already. They ( and the very active forum ) have been very helpful with the Low Memory messages I was getting early on, and since then I’ve not had that message again. The support from WaveMachine Labs is encouraging. Remember Apple is often slow to approve submitted updates.

 
 Auria to me is as close to what I call the holy grail of iDAWs, as seen to date. It’s not all powerful, and won’t replace desktop DAWs, but with further development, refinement, and increased VST plug in support it could be someday.

It is the best iDAW available with no peer. It actually saddens me a bit to say that as I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my studio type apps for a good while. I’m not saying don’t ever buy any others, but it’s very hard to deny Auria’s presence as a game changer for mobile music production.
Its $49.99 price tag is high by the standards of most spoiled iOS customers, but relatively speaking it’s a very good value, and so are the additional plug ins. You get what you pay for.
I haven’t bought any of the current plug ins myself, as I’m finding the included tools are more than sufficient for my needs and desires for high quality results. I am excited about whats to come.

 

Transitioning from other studio apps to Auria might seem overwhelming at first glance.  I really haven’t experienced any instances where Auria presented me with anything confusing. Just some things that are new to me on this platform. Still, I read the user guide front to back and I’d recommend you do too. If you don’t want to, (really who wants to read a manual ?) but do have experience with apps like this, it will probably feel pleasantly familiar. Reading the guide will at least accelerate any potential learning curve while also uncovering useful things that might have otherwise been overlooked. For example I was very excited about 64 bit processing, but wasn’t clear on its impact compared to 32. I discovered you can either select 64 bit processing, or unselect it to default at 32 bits. 32 bits lessens the burden on your device resources, and is still pretty darn good. Point is, I discovered something useful by just reading a little. A lot of the things I see some users complain about are easily solved, or operator error. Anything else is being reviewed, and I have no reservations about trusting fixes will come soon.

 
If you’re ready to take the step forward into the bright future of iOS music production, click
 
 
to be directed to Auria in iTunes

I highly recommend Auria for iPad 2&3 users. I’ve not experienced Auria on iPad 1.

 

UPDATED 1-28-13

Since I wrote the above review after Aurias initial release a lot has changed.
They’ve added numerous professional plug ins to the mix further improving on the already excellent capabilities. More are likely to come as things progress. Check out my separate series of “Auria FX & Plug Ins Reviews” for more on those.
This iDAW is really the only one of its kind on iOS. Yes there are other breeds of good iDAW types, but none have the audio quality, processing capabilities, FX, and tools to do a complete production at Aurias level.
That said, Auria is by no means perfect, or a full desktop DAW replacement. It is closing the gap more than anything else on iOS.
The biggest problems are with CPU and memory.
I’m using iPad 3, and find I can get by just fine without any serious troubles. iPad 4 is probably more desirable. iPad 2 can eek by, but with a lot more restrictions requiring more patience. iPad 1 will probably burst into flames on start up?

Now with Audiobus support Auria has taken another fine leap forward making the workflow more of a great pleasure. I don’t know about you but I’ve had quite enough of AudioCopy/Paste.
With that added convenience, so comes even more strain on device resources. WaveMachine Labs suggests using iPads 3&4. iPad 2 can do it, but in small doses.

There’s some bugs still.
Every new update brings dozens of fixes, improvements, and additions. Crashes can happen if care is not exercised in how much is being done at one time. Most bugs are minor but frustrating nonetheless. This is a very complex program, & its still early for Auria. You can be confident in its development.
Its not difficult to squeeze a lot from Auria. Track freeze! This helps a lot on all devices.
When using plug ins or FX, just freeze those tracks at every opportunity. Unfreezing is very quick, so going back and forth is really a minor issue. This becomes especially important on iPad 2 and even more so when using Audiobus. For that matter when using Audiobus with Auria, it is advisable to bypass all FX, in addition to freezing any tracks not in use for the recording session.
That’s what I do, and its not a problem.

If you have any problems visit the forum for help. Its given lots of attention by knowledgable end users and the development team is very active.

UPDATED 4-5-13

The main complaints I’ve seen that aren’t operator error relate to the interface. “Clunky, choppy, sluggish” are some of the words I’ve heard uttered in regard to Aurias GUI. Much of it hasn’t bothered me personally, but I can see what people mean. Some things that are most odd to me would be the loads of drop downs, and menus to make selections of functions that would be better served by multi touch support. Now, Auria is starting to improve in this area with the addition of automatic region duplication by touching the end handle. This makes the chore no longer a chore where duplicating is concerned.
Another new feature is Time Stretch. Also enabled by multi touch. WaveMachine labs clearly considered Time Stretching seriously and chose the DIRAC algorithm which is known to be very good. After using it myself I must agree. Though I’m not fond of the first and second touch on the handle to activate it. Sometimes it doesn’t work because I time the first then second touch wrong. It does work though. Imported samples are time stretch automatically. Nice! I happen to think a single touch and drag would be better. At any rate these two new features are greatly appreciated and needed.
Additional improvements have been made to the Audibus functionality. Thank you!
Real time scrubbing has also been added. Again using multi touch to activate.
There’s other thngs, improvements and bug squashings, but these are the most note worthy of you ask me.
MIDI is surely in the nearer future. I’m just glad they are listening to user feedback and showing with solid actions that they hear you.
Auria is taking the right steps in the right direction. Very encouraging.