music apps

Are We Spoiled?

We have so many amazing applications at our disposal, for crazy low prices. So why do people complain so much about iOS ad ons that are just as good as their desktop counterparts?
Ill use Auria as an example since it has the largest selection of ad ons and plugins currently available with iOS DAWs.
For the moment lets suspend our personal feelings of the app itself and focus on the relative costs for perspective.
Auria itself is $50 and comes with 32-64 bit audio processing, a stellar convolution reverb, a sophisticated standard EQ, Automation, FX, and numerous pro grade features. All working very well, for a lot of people including for me. Far from perfect but all things considered, not a bad value.
Considering its limitations, largely because of the iPads limited CPU and system resources, its pretty damned capable and priced appropriately.
If you want a comparable DAW on your desktop or laptop you will pay not only more for the hardware, but also a bunch more for the software.
FL Studio Producer is about $199.99 for example with similar standard features. Obviously there are differences, but the relative point here is about what you get for your dollar.
Other PC DAWs can cost more, hundreds more.
Now consider the plugins.
Auria has many FabFilter plugins just as good as the same ones for PCs.
FabFilter Pro Q for example is about $190.00 for PCs and $30 for Auria users. Yet are practically identical.
Somehow I still see people complain that $30 is way too expensive. WHAT?
Folks have their reasons for complaining about prices in great variety. None that I’ve heard have sounded the least bit relevant, or slightly reasonable, and in fact strike me as nothing more than unrealistic, and spoiled.
There are several ad ons and plugins to compare that show the very same price differences for pretty much all the equally available quality plugins. In every case the iOS option is drastically less costly.
Why so many silly complaints then?
Some say it doesn’t work, or they can’t get it to work. That also strikes me as strange since I have no problems with it at all.
I have no special super human powers, so I assume its operator error on their part. It works fine.
Before you start listing all your reasons for why you don’t like Auria or its plugins, remember this really isn’t about why you like it or don’t. If you’re going to go on about why PCs are better, again thats not on topic here, and why would you care anyway? I have no illusions of the disparity of power between iPad and PCs. iPad gets the job done just fine for those who wish to take the alternate route despite known limitations. This is about the costs. This is about the question “Are We Spoiled”?
Looking at the brief (yes I am aware its a general comparison) comparisons it seems clear to me that the complaints about the cost of iOS plugin options are ridiculous at the very best.
Just having a quality convolution reverb with a vast I.R. Library included (not including the additional I.R. libraries purchasable for tiny sums) is worth the $50 that Auria costs alone. GASP! How can I say that?
Well, a convolution reverb sounding just as good on PC will run you around $250! Some cost way more than that even.
So yes, $50 for the whole package (that again works fine for me on my iPad4, once I figured out all the silly settings necessary) convolution reverb included.
What the hell more do you want? Are we spoiled or what?
We’re only just getting started with iOS seeing DAWs supporting high quality options, tools, and plugins. So as we see more in the future are we still going to be complaining about the low prices being way too high?
I really hope not. Its not unrealistic to be concerned that some developers may choose to not go ahead with their product because the users are unwilling to accept the low cost of their product, much less any ad ons they might offer.
That’s a nightmare scenario, and I don’t sit up nights worried about it, but there is some reason to be concerned.
If developers see a community of users still complaining about even low prices, they might not make our dream iDAWs (or whatever app) because of that spoiled cacophony going on and on about nonsensical price expectations.
I’m not point the finger, though it kind of looks that way, but I am just as guilty as the next guy or gal. Or I was. I get it. I understand we have been spoiled by the super low costs of super cool apps for years. All the while we were still complaining or demanding more.
So as we get to the point now that “more” is becoming realized, so are the options, and slightly increased prices. All of the iOS app prices while maybe being higher than we started with are still very low.
You can’t have more, and get it for less. Its not a fair position to take.
Isn’t it time we start appreciating the progress instead of looking for things to complain about?
Its OK to not like something because it doesn’t fit in with your way of doing things, but lets try to not bash things that many folks find to be an excellent value and have no trouble working with. Lets try to not get bent out of shape when something costs a little more than we’re used to while offering us the “more” we demanded, and still for much less than its PC counterpart.
Bad for you is not the end all be all qualifier of a bad app on the whole. Sure there are “bad” apps, and apps that are priced inappropriately, but what’s the point of ridiculing them to death again and again? There are no rewards or points scored for complaining, especially about low prices. It just ends up making a lot of people look very spoiled. Who wants that?
Maybe we can all look a little harder at the bright side? See more of the positives. Be champions for this new thing and have some patience. It’ll all get there sooner than later.
However if its all really that terrible to you, then why are you torturing yourself? Go back to your PC or whatever made you happy before. Not everything is for everyone, but everyone can be a little more positive and grateful for what they have. Why not?

“100” A Personal Retrospective

Everyone has a story. When, why, and how they came to appreciate iOS for creating music has many different perspectives. So much has happened and changed since I started. This is my (first) 100th blog post, and I will share some of my story from before I started blogging, through today and the future of iOS Music as I see it. At the very bottom of this is a little gift of some custom Nave patch banks I made. Enjoy.

Its been more than 4 years now that I’ve been enjoying the iOS Music ride.
I’ve watched it all grow from a cool curiosity with potential to a full blown serious music production option.
When I got my first iPod Touch I had no idea what would unfold, or how much my life would change.
I had already given up on pursuing my passion for making music ages ago. I sold all of my guitars, abandoned my hopes of buying a modern, high end synthesizer, and laughed at the notion of using computers to make music. It was final. I was not ever going to be able to let the ideas I had for music out of my head.
It was all just too damned expensive. I couldn’t ever justify spending thousands of dollars on even the basic gear I would have needed. So I forgot about it and let that dream just die. Sure there is always a way, but the timing and events in my life always made it impractical.

One day with my new iTouch in hand I was checking out the App Store for new games, when on a whim I checked the “Music” category for the first time. I saw an app called “LoopTastic”. The description sounded very interesting and fun. So I downloaded it.
That first hour with the app was a ton of fun for me. More than just fun, it felt like something very special was happening. I was feeling creative and inspired. It was all just a bunch of pre-made loops that I was arranging, but it sparked something in me.
Playing with loops was fun, but it didn’t take long before I wanted to make my own stuff. So I started visiting the App Store music section more and more. Hexatone was the first instrument type app I bought. That summer of 2009 was an extremely exciting and inspirational time of exploring new possibilities. More and more apps were popping up with more and more creative possibilities.
Long story short, I created an alias for myself and started recording mixes of loops, and recordings I made from other apps all together. I called myself “Sounds Off Center” and eventually made a MySpace page to put the mixes I was making on.
I called my first digital album “Box Thought” and printed a few CDs to give to friends and family. Nothing special.
“Sounds Off Center” and “Box Thought” were quickly pushed aside in favor of pursuing a more refined musical production. I had actually forgotten about that until I was reminded by a fellow iOS music enthusiast about its existence. I was inspired and motivated to do this by an old professional musician friend of mine, who thought what I was doing was very cool, and sounded great. He was starting his label up and looking for new and interesting things. I was stunned when he suggested signing with him and then, under his tutelage learning techniques and whatnot, he would release my first all iOS made album. That was extremely flattering to me coming from him, so I started to really take things seriously at that point. Why not, right?
“SmiteMatter” was born. For those who don’t know or are curious, the name “SmiteMatter” came from my lifelong love of the old 70s anime “Star Blazers” AKA “Space Battleship Yamato”.
The iPad still didn’t exist yet, but I was planning to make a full album using that iPod Touch with all the music apps I was accumulating. Everything was happening so fast!
Music apps were getting more sophisticated and rapidly evolving. Music Studio was the first “serious” music production app I owned. Then NanoStudio and BeatMaker. Nano would occupy most of my time creating music in the palm of my hand. Beat Maker seemed like it would be great, but I hated the interface and never wanted to use it. It just made me miserable, and that’s not a good feeling to have while trying to enjoy oneself.
I was happily using iTunes File Share, and wi-fi to move recordings but wishing for something more immediate. AudioCopy/Paste was a hack, but it became very important in the absence of any wireless alternatives.
As the apps were becoming more sophisticated, I couldn’t believe how inexpensive they still were. I was using them to make music that would have cost tons more any other way. So even though at the time this was relatively the more difficult of options, it was by far the most affordable. Not to mention the huge potential.
Then the iPad came out.
That further revolutionized the whole concept of electronic music, at least for me.
By today’s standards it was very underpowered, yet for the time, powerful enough to get more complex productions done. AudioCopy/Paste was essential in my workflow. I abandoned “File Share” and never looked back. “Say no to wires” became my motto. The mobile flexibility was hugely attractive to me. Having the ability to go where ever I wish and create some tunes was, and still is a big deal. Going to a local park, the forest, or even nearby Mt.Rainier would become my studios. My music studio was anywhere I happen to be. All without any electrical power support. Trees don’t have electrical outlets so being forced to stop everything to plug in just to move files was incredibly irritating to me. It disrupted the creative process for no good reason. I could not understand why music apps were even being made without ACP? It made no sense to me at all.
I heard some reasons from some developers about why they were not using ACP in their apps, but their reasons, while logical (I suppose) at the core, were silly when clearly (to me) the big picture was about mobility and convenience. Making customers stop everything to sync their device in order to move a recording from one app to another seemed cruel. ACP was certainly not ideal, but it did get the job done. It worked. It was all we had then. A choice is always better than no choice at all. At any rate something better was desperately needed.

With the added power of that first iPad we started to see more iDAWs. Since Music Studio was still without ACP, I abandoned it in favor of more flexible work stations.
I got Studio HD, and Multitrack DAW to create my mixes. NLog Synth Pro was my main synth workhorse, and is still a favorite synth now. Other often used apps at the time included Xenon, MorphWiz, ThumbJam, Twisted Wave and iMS20. Half of the music for my official first album “Technopolis Lost” was made using my iPod Touch, and the rest came with that first iPad.

I started blogging reluctantly several months before my album released. It was something I didn’t want to do, but a respected friend was adamant that I should. So I did it. He had suggested I write all about what I was doing. That idea bored the shit out of me. After a few experiments figuring out what to blog about I settled on a combination of reviews and my own experiences. I didn’t want to do anything that I didn’t think I could do well. Ill never forget the first few comments I got with the earliest blog experiments. “You’re an idiot” by: Anonymous, and “You just squandered all the legitimacy you earned with that Sunrizer Synth review, by spreading that (something about a new iPad release date) rumor” or something like that, from “Robert”. I guess I made a comment that really pissed off a couple folks? I did not want to make people angry, so I made it a point to not write reviews of anything I didn’t like or know about. Keep it positive, and waste no time with the negative, seems to be the best philosophy.

While I was finishing up “Technopolis Lost” there was a flurry of new, increasingly powerful and capable music apps being released. Additionally I was discovering existing apps like MoDrum, while new ones like, Garage Band Mobile, Sunrizer, and Addictive Synth came out, raising the bar. They just kept coming or being discovered, constantly changing things for me. Apps were changing my life as much as they were changing music production. Garage Band Mobile excited me right away, but that excitement soon faded when I found it couldn’t do much for me. Too many limitations and initially no ACP. It was inefficient, and I gave up on it.

Virtual Core MIDI was making many things much easier, but it wasn’t really anything I was using often. I had always preferred to do everything with audio.
Nevertheless, MIDI capability had been there for much of the infancy.
I hated the idea of connecting anything by wire, and as time went on would continue using only my iOS devices and apps for all of my music. ACP was still very important, but becoming more and more unappealing to me. I wanted to stream audio from one app to the other. I wanted something much like what was found on computers with DAWs and VSTs. Basically a virtual audio cable to and from apps. Why was it taking so long? It drove me crazy having to rely heavily on ACP when it seemed so obvious that someone should and could make an app to bridge the gap between apps. It wasn’t easy, but I had gotten by with ACP, and finished “Technopolis Lost” which released October 2011. Much of it without many of the tools or features we have today.

I had been hearing (still do, but I am kind of bored with that bullshit now) of course that a large number of people considered iOS in regards to music production to be nothing more than a novelty, or just “toys”. Some people thought well of my album and production. I heard from people who thought it was amazing on its own musical merits, but some also added it was especially good since it was all done without any hardware or computer aid.
Oddly a few people insisted there was no way I made that whole album using only my iDevices and apps. I took that as a compliment, but a couple were pretty harsh about it. Harsh in that they would accuse me of lying and that I must’ve used some computer DAW and or other pro hardware. It was the accusation questioning my honesty that hurt. Well, nothing I can do about it. The truth is the truth. Funny thing is, they insist it can’t be done because the “sound and production quality is beyond the capabilities of the devices and apps,” I did in fact use. Man, get your head around that. If anyone can, I’d like to know how to make sense of such crazy talk.
Whatever the case. It can be done. I did it. Others have done it. You can do it too.

Animoog came out, taking things to a new level, and pissed me off because my album had just released! Oh boy what a major kick in the pants Animoog gave me! Then later that year BeatMaker 2 came along. I bought it immediately despite no iPad native support. It looked like the interface was cleaned up a lot, and had an impressive list of features. I ended up disliking it albeit a little less than BM1. StudioHD and Multitrack DAW would continue being my go-to production apps while cleaning up my recordings with more apps like “Reforge” and “Twisted Wave”.

Then iPad 2 came along. Much more powerful and faster than the iPad 1, it became my main workhorse and for a while my iPad 1 was my secondary device. That was when I stopped using my iPod Touch regularly.
When I finally got myself that iPad 2, Apple announced iPad 3 shortly after. Damn it. So I bought an iPad 3 a few months after it came out.
It was about then that I felt iOS Music was really on the verge of becoming widely acceptable as a serious option. Not just as it had been already for me, but to a much larger audience. The apps were outstanding, and floods of new people were joining in. In July 2012 Auria hit me like a ton of bricks and I was sure it would be “the” thing to push everything into mainstream. Oops, that didn’t happen as I expected. It did show off the incredible possibilities, and high quality audio I was sure more “pros” would perk up to. It had full automation, high quality EQ, FX, and real plug in support too. The first (for iOS) convolution reverb too.
It also showed off how far behind the devices were. A very powerful app for a very underpowered generation of devices. Still no inter-app audio connectivity. ACP was still a necessary evil and while helping me get my job done, it was holding back the whole concept of mobile music being taken seriously. It really was sounding like the biggest detractor was the inability to connect apps.
In contrast to the disappointments my eagerness to continue was unhindered seeing only the huge potential and making it work as best as I could. Clearly “we” were progressing.

There was no end in sight for increasingly powerful and innovative music apps.
PPG started developing for iOS, as did Steinberg Media. Cubasis was another big iDAW. Although it has a great interface, it’s a castrated beast without automation, quality FX and no mastering tools to be taken seriously. Yet.
More major brands were creating more serious emulations of old hardware, and or totally new apps. We had Yamaha, Korg, ImageLine, and Moog among other big names. They seemed to be taking this all seriously, but there was still a lot of resistance among many musicians.

Then iPad 4 came out on the heels of the iPad 3 release. Are you effing kidding me Apple? Sigh. At least it had a faster CPU and every improvement helps, but small incremental improvements aren’t enough. Nevertheless I bought one a couple months after Audiobus was born.
OH RIGHT! Audiobus. With the end of 2012 came the beginning of one of the most important music apps seen to date. After long months of rumor, speculation, and impatient would-be customers, it finally arrived. Excuse me here but, HOLY SHIT! The solution to inter-app audio connectivity was here, and it works! Mostly.
“The Bus” would sweep many off their feet, myself included. No more stupid iTunes File Share! No more hack work around, AudioCopy/Paste! Now making music on our iPads would be just like on a computer. Play the synth running through some FX, being recorded by an iDAW. Sweet! Mostly.
I said “mostly” twice. You probably wonder why? I mean that, to get the best results while using Audiobus, it depends a lot on what other apps are being used, and on which device. Forget about iPad 1. Be ready for some pains with iPad2. Start getting comfortable with iPad 3. Finally, have the best possible experience with iPad 4. That’s not the end all be all, and I’m generalizing a bit. Specifically, that’s how I’ve seen and experienced things. There are numerous combinations of apps and devices that vary wildly from one example to the next. So mostly, its all good. It’s definitely better than before.
However AudioCopy/Paste isn’t dead. Many people are still using it with no problems happily. Sometimes I find myself using it for certain circumstances. The thing is, there’s a choice now for most users, that’s a good thing.

This year, 2013 is reaching its sunset. We have had some spectacular new apps arrive, older ones updated with Audiobus support during and a bit before the year’s start. NanoStudio, iPolySix, EchoPad, Samplr, PPG WaveMapper, Turnado, Audio Mastering App, Magellan, Waldorf – Nave, Propellerhead Softwares, Thor Polysonic Synth. Arturia brought us an emulation of the MiniMoog with the “iMINI” synth app. More and more. Getting better and better. What we have today compared to when this all started is a big jump.
Not just big named developers with their big brands, but a magnificent collection of independent developers continue to bring us outstanding new apps and advancements. Each for tiny asking prices.
Having tolerated the cheap reverbs over these years we now have at least 3 high quality stand-alone reverb apps. More to come? Well there are definitely going to be more stand-alone FX apps. Elephant Candy released the sweet “Ultra Phaser” effects app. Kymatica is working on a delay unit called “DUB” to add to its expanding AUFX series.
Not just FX, but more complete audio mastering suites are coming. There’s exciting development of new synths, iDAWs and countless other highly useful new music apps. Never a dull moment.
We really do have everything we need including continued development.

We want more.
From the beginning I always wanted more. I’ve experienced the beginning of it all and throughout I’ve enjoyed seeing all the advancements pushing things further ahead. Change is good. Anyone involved in iOS music at any level whether starting today, or started 4 (or more) years ago, will want something more. What will come next? What do we need? Since I’ve been writing all of this from my own personal perspective I’ll chime in with a bit of what my vision is for the ideal future.
First we need a much more powerful iPad. I get by fine with what is available today, but I’m not fooling myself into believing the current level of power is sufficient. At least not if all of this is to finally be taken seriously by the resistant and so-called “pros”. We are beyond the “toy” phase I think. Probably have been for a while. There is a lot that can be done now, and at a high level. Unfortunately more is still needed.
I don’t think its unrealistic to envision an iPad with at least a 2ghz CPU, with 2 GB ram and a stereo microphone jack. It should include at least one USB port and lightning port. Pressure (wishing here) sensitivity. An iPad “Pro” maybe? I don’t know what that processor would be, but I’m sure the technology exists in some way or another that could be made to work. It would be a nice start for the next gen. iPads, I think.
I see the future of app development bringing more innovative ways to make music.
Some brand new synths, not more analogue emulations are needed. Though I wouldn’t turn down any classic remakes.
We need a full blown DAW. I don’t care who makes it, but I want it.
We do not need more half assed iDAWs that do not have decent FX, Mastering Tools, full MIDI support, and Automation.
I don’t know about you, but I’ve had it with new music apps being released without Audiobus support. Maybe after iOS 7 arrives with the speculated solution of Inter-App Audio integration which, speculated or not, is highly desirable for the future of iOS Music. It would be very nice if it were to allow audio & MIDI to transmit from one device to another via WiFi or Bluetooth. Maybe it will, or maybe it will later?Eventually it’ll have to. I’d like to be able to play a synth on one while the other is recording it wirelessly.
iTunes File Share must not ever again be the only way to move files in any music app. That was OK in 2009, but today (or even 2 years ago) it’s flat out useless.
We need apps sold in tiers to have the “Pro” tiered version include all features, no IAPs. It sells at a premium, so it should come with all premium features. Always.

This being my 100th blog post is to me much like iOS Music in general. Its early. There is much more to come.

I honestly believe this is the future of music and will be very commonplace in the near future. Technology will make most anything possible in time. Having a way to be creative that is both high quality and affordable is something we all need. This didn’t exist in my 20s or 30s. OK, 38 it did. That’s a lot of years being unable to have an outlet, wasted. I hope nobody ever has to shelve their creative desires again. Making music is not an exclusive club for “some”. It is a right for all. There is always plenty of room for more people to join in the fun and express their musical ideas without requiring huge amounts of money for the tools. iOS Music is now, and so long as the quality keeps pace, will be, one of the greatest things to ever happen to music.

Lets all keep happening!

Thank you for reading: “100” A Personal Retrospective.
I hope you enjoyed my hundredth blog post sharing my personal take and experiences, on all of this through my eyes.
I couldn’t include everything I wanted to without this being a lot longer. I am a bit nervous sharing as much as I did. Its pretty long as is even after much editing, so I sincerely hope you found this a worthwhile read? If you have anything to add, please do comment. This isn’t all just about me. I am very interested in your story, or thoughts. Thank you. See ya at 101!

Its not a big deal, but as a small token of my appreciation a special 2 banks of custom patches I made for Nave is free to download via Dropbox.
SmiteMatter 100 part 1 Nave
SmiteMatter 100 part 2

Galileo Organ – Review

Galileo Organ
Developed By: Yonac Inc

20130609-162347.jpg

Organs in general don’t usually pique my curiosity, much less much interest. Don’t get me wrong, they can bring something special to music, and many classics like Pink Floyd have immortalized the sound. I’ve tried some emulations on iOS, but haven’t ever felt like they offered much, and besides with a little effort most Organ sounds can be made in some of my synths.
Galileo Organ is a whole new ball game. For the first time in my life, an Organ made for iOS has knocked my socks off. This Organ is made by Yonac who also created the monstrous Magellan Synth, so you know its going to be good.

20130609-163019.jpg

Galileo is a professional virtual analog Organ design able to flawlessly emulate realistic Tonewheel, Transister, with “leakage”and other styles. It is complete with 3 rotary cabinet types, at 32bit DSP.
Officially it has 11 Organ types, but with some tweaking of the many parameters it is capable of emulating pretty much any Organ in existence. I think?
Somehow they managed to squeeze 3 configurable manuals with their drawbars (Hi, Lo keyboards and Pedals) all on to one screen.
Galileo has 48 polyphony, (I’m going to need more fingers?) brake/speed & slow/fast toggles.
Configurable rotary acceleration, brightness, drum to horn balance, and stereo mic separation.
They threw in just about every Organ related bells and whistles around.
I’m not an expert on Organs so a bunch of the Organ speak, is new lingo to me. I trust my ears, and what I am hearing with Galileo sounds beautiful.

Theres tons of technical specs here, and as usual to save space I suggest you check out YonacSoftwares Blog for the whole rundown.

20130609-165142.jpg
Packed with 240 carefully designed presets including a bank by Sunsine, have most bases covered for whatever Organ sound you’re looking for. Does Galileo do Hammond? Yep, and like I said above, pretty much every other as well.
Patch making is where I get the most giddy, and there is plenty of room here to create and save custom patches. Banks can also be shared. Which is very nice of you want to take your creations from one iDevice and put it on another.

20130609-165947.jpg
Galileos arpeggiator will feel right at home to Magellan users. Even if you haven’t used Magellan (are you insane?) you’ll find this arpeggiator intuitive. You can run simple patterns, or customize your own. You have control (dedicated note buffer for each of the 3 manuals) over the Hi,Lo, keyboards and Pedals in your Arps. Gate, Octave, Swing and note repeats are also under your command.

20130609-170547.jpg
The FX are of a breed that you might not find in most synths, which of course should make sense as this is an Organ. Some are familiar, but others are unique to Organs. They are split into 2 FX screens.

• 4 types of Wah-Wah with adjustable sweep range & emphasis
• Autowah module w/ 5 sweep curves, 3 follow modes, velocity tracking, settable rate, phase and bpm syncing
• Ring Modulator / Tremolo with fast & slow modes and adjustable depth
• Delay, Reverb & configurable FX signal path
The signal path mentioned is a slick touch, drag, and drop window.
The FX all sound great, and I have had an especially grand time messing around with the Wah-Wah.

20130609-171149.jpg

Recording and managing files are well done, and again designed in a familiar manner. The “Tape” screen is swiftly navigated making it a painless experience to record, and manage. Adjustable count in, record on touch, fixed record lengths, and all your importing and exporting is done smoothly here.

20130609-171712.jpg

No iOS music app would be complete without Audiobus, standard sharing, and MIDI supports.
Galileo is complete with Audiobus Input, and FX slot support. General and Sonoma AudioCopy/Paste.
The MIDI implementation is robust with 3 IO channels, over 130 control destinations, keyboard splitting, sustain and expression supports etc.
All the MIDI stuff is accessed from the “Pref” screen, where you’ll also find 50 or so scales to assign whatever key you wish.
Yonac has done another bang up job with offering yet anther full and complete new music app to enjoy.

20130609-172440.jpg

Having enjoyed YonacSoftwares MagellanSynth for a while, it is no surprise to me that Galileo would be of the same high caliber. Its stable, clean, and sounds so damn good. I really can’t find anything to complain about. I am suddenly now a fan of Organs thanks to the sublime design and execution of this app. If you’re a die hard Organ lover, I dare say you won’t be disappointed by Galileo one bit. Even folks like me who would normally be apathetic to such instruments would find this worth a very close look. You’ll likely start looking for ways to incorporate Galileo into your music.
Its just that good.

Highly recommended. Must Have!

The Music App Gamble

Something has been bothering me for a while. I have this folder on my iPad (both actually) I call “Music Apps With Potential”. It is full of incomplete music apps that are missing vital, basic functions. I can’t use them in their current builds because each is missing what I (most people I think would agree) consider very basic functions, and supports.
Those which I consider to be very basic are AudioCopy/Paste, midi, Audiobus, and or a built in recording feature. Basically the things that all iOS music apps should never be without. I’m not talking about expansions, or additional features that will increase usability. No, I am talking about the stuff that most of us expect and need in order to use the app to begin with. Stuff that if missing inhibit and or impead use.

It makes me a bit sad actually. So many music apps with great design. They’re innovative, unique, and just down right cool! Some are real game changers.
I knew they were half baked when I bought them, but I did check with each developer to confirm their development plans before purchase. Each of these were confirmed that the vital functions I had asked about, will be added in future updates. The time frames for these promised updates vary from app to app, but each had been confirmed.

With each confirmation I happily supported what I thought to be excellent development and I paid for the app.
Most of the time apps of this type don’t remain in the “potential” folder very long. They usually get the update in a timely manner or as promised. Unfortunately some never get out of app purgatory. Too many for me.
It is a little frustrating to see them there as a constant reminder of how many times I’ve been burned.
Worse is that such great innovations are abandoned and left unrealized.

While this sort of thing is a fairly small percentage of the whole, it is common. For me it’s common enough to make me reconsider ever purchasing another music app that cannot be used the day I buy it.
I understand that developers need to make money, and I have felt sympathetic frequently enough to take the gamble with buying their apps before they were really even close to ready. Always gambling on their word being true. Too many times have I been left holding an empty bag several months or even a year later having nothing to show for it.

They may have excellent reasons but I just don’t care. I see it as a breach of confidence. A hollow word, and an empty promise. It says a lot about ones integrity to break a promise or take advantage of people who will trust the giving of a seemingly honorable word. Even though most follow through, enough don’t and leave me feeling like it is now an undesirable gamble. Risky stuff sometimes. You know what they say about one bad apple.

It’s too risky of a gamble for me anymore. Simply put, after these many unfortunate experiences having lost the gamble, I am done. Finish the app, then I will buy it. I don’t believe I am being unreasonable to expect a product I buy should be finished and ready for intended use. How about you?

Best Of 2012

That was fast. A whole year has come and gone seemingly in a blink. The iOS music scene has moved closer to mainstream acceptance. Many advances have come pushing us and our devices into new territories of music production. Loads of new people have taken the plunge into iOS music embracing the concepts, challenges, and growing benefits. This past year has seen amazing growth in those using iOS and in the technical advances of the apps designed.

The novelty is worn off. For me it wore off long ago. This is for real. The future is happening now, and iOS music is becoming a very significant part of the whole music world. Even though still relatively in its early stages iOS music is a force. Full of great artists, bloggers, and developers propelling it forward. It’s you, me, and everyone willing to do something a little different.

This past year has brought us some incredible new developments in the apps we use. So I salute the very best, the most innovative music apps of 2012.

What follows are a few of the best new iOS music apps RELEASED in 2012.

Best Drum & Percussion – DrumJam – A remarkable way to make beats.

Best Synth – Magellan – 2 fantastic synths in 1 with combined 6 oscillators, & built in sequencer

Best Sampler – Samplr – A brilliantly crafted sampler that inspires creativity in a well design U.I.

Best Sequencer – iPolySix – A reborn classic synth with automation & intuitive sequencing.

Best Generative – SpaceWiz – Make a whole solar system sing. Just beautiful.

Best Glitch – GlitchBreaks – Ridiculously fun & crazy useful. A category all it’s own.

Best Virtual MIDI controller – Gestrument- Expressive, easy, and well made. Endless inspiration.

Best iDAW – Auria – A truly high quality virtual recording studio complete with serious FX, full automation, splendid mastering tools, and plug ins. Attentive development & more on the way. The iOS iDAW.

Best Innovative Design – Impaktor – You, A table, iPad & drum out for real. The ultimate drum kit.

Best Unique Sound Creation – iPulsaret – The most complete granular synthesis app.

Best iOS Music App of 2012 – Audiobus – Simply ties it all together with ease.

20121221-153349.jpg

It has been another amazing year full of great music app development. I want to thank everyone for reading my reviews and who enjoy my music. lots more to come!
I also thank the developers for all their hard work to bring us such fantastic apps.

Hey, if you think I left something out that really deserves inclusion leave a comment about it. There are certainly lots of very good new music apps beyond just what I felt are the best. The apps I chose above are just what, in my humble opinion really stood out, brought something new to the table and changed how I make music. Also this list is only for music apps released in 2012. Prior years releases are a whole other kind of list.

Honorable Mention- AudioShare, PPG WaveGenerator, Audulus, EchoPad, & Borderlands are just a handful of some of the other big stand outs of this past year.

Cheers and Happy New Year!